Cancer and Blood Disorders Center

Statistics and Outcomes

At Seattle Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, our outcomes significantly exceed the national average for a wide range of cancers.

  • “Outcomes” refer to the results of treatment and evaluate how effective care is. We also provide statistics such as the number of stem cell transplants performed and patients seen (volumes). 
    We gather this data to:  

    • Measure the health of our patients 
    • Improve the quality of the care we provide 
    • Help you make informed decisions about your child’s care 

    Learn more about outcomes at Seattle Children’s.

Five-Year Survival of Cancer Patients Diagnosed 2004 to 2013

We treat the entire range of childhood and young adult blood disorders and cancers – including rare and complex diseases. We bring years of experience to your child’s unique situation.

Seattle Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center is the largest pediatric oncology program in the Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana and Idaho (WWAMI) region and the second-largest program west of the Rocky Mountains. Our survival rates consistently exceed the national average. This chart shows:

  • The percentage of children with cancer who survived for at least 5 years after doctors diagnosed their disease. The children represented here were diagnosed between 2004 and 2013, and at that time they were age 20 or younger.
  • “Five-year survival” is the measurement for success used by hospitals throughout the nation. Using this measurement allows you to compare us with other hospitals
  • 90.6%
    Seattle Children’s 5-year survival
    88.5%
    National average 5-year survival
    482
    Number of Seattle Children’s patients
  • 72.3%
    Seattle Children’s 5-year survival
    66.2%
    National average 5-year survival
    121
    Number of Seattle Children’s patients
  • 83.5%
    Seattle Children’s 5-year survival
    72.9%
    National average 5-year survival
    723
    Number of Seattle Children’s patients
  • 66.0%
    Seattle Children’s 5-year survival
    70.1%
    National average 5-year survival
    74
    Number of Seattle Children’s patients
  • 89.1%
    Seattle Children’s 5-year survival
    95.9%
    National average 5-year survival
    57
    Number of Seattle Children’s patients
  • 98.0%
    Seattle Children’s 5-year survival
    96.6%
    National average 5-year survival
    102
    Number of Seattle Children’s patients
  • 83.2%
    Seattle Children’s 5-year survival
    88.4%
    National average 5-year survival
    103
    Number of Seattle Children’s patients
  • 80.6%
    Seattle Children’s 5-year survival
    79.8%
    National average 5-year survival
    118
    Number of Seattle Children’s patients
  • 59.5%
    Seattle Children’s 5-year survival
    66.2%
    National average 5-year survival
    87
    Number of Seattle Children’s patients
  • 54.9%
    Seattle Children’s 5-year survival
    66.1%
    National average 5-year survival
    56
    Number of Seattle Children’s patients
  • 100%
    Seattle Children’s 5-year survival
    99.0%
    National average 5-year survival
    46
    Number of Seattle Children’s patients
  • 96.7%
    Seattle Children’s 5-year survival
    92.3%
    National average 5-year survival
    95
    Number of Seattle Children’s patients

Where does this data come from?

This data reflects national metrics reported to the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program at the National Cancer Institute, which is part of the National Institutes of Health.

Number of New Cancer Patients Annually, 2014-2018

Seattle Children’s treats some of the WWAMI region’s most complex, advanced cancers and blood disorders.

Total number of new patients, 2014–2018

1,258

2018

233
Age 0 to 14
69
Age 15 to 20+

2017

210
Age 0 to 14
67
Age 15 to 20+

2016

203
Age 0 to 14
82
Age 15 to 20+

2015

213
Age 0 to 14
77
Age 15 to 20+

2014

186
Age 0 to 14
76
Age 15 to 20+

2013

185
Age 0 to 14
67
Age 15 to 20+

2012

183
Age 0 to 14
63
Age 15 to 20+

Average New Cancer Patients Annually by Disease (2014 to 2018)

44
Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL)
12
Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)
85
Brain
6
Ewing sarcoma
8
Germ cell
13
Hodgkin lymphoma
5
Liver
9
Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
15
Neuroblastoma
7
Osteosarcoma
8
Renal (kidney)
5
Retinoblastoma
6
Rhabdomyosarcoma
8
Soft tissue tumors
6
Thyroid
7
Wilms

Stem Cell Transplant Survival Rates, 2004–2018

The tables below show information about Seattle Children’s patients who had a stem cell transplant.

Stem cell transplant (100-day) survival rates, 2004–2018

This table shows the percentages of patients who survived for at least 100 days after their transplant:

98%
2018
94%
2017
97%
2016
95%
2015
95%
2014
96%
2013
100%
2012
96%
2011
100%
2010
89%
2009
90%
2008
93%
2007
90%
2006
96%
2005
82%
2004

Stem cell transplant (1-year) survival rates, 2004–2017

This table shows the percentages of patients who survived for at least 1 year after their transplant:

87%
2017
89%
2016
82%
2015
91%
2014
84%
2013
89%
2012
89%
2011
95%
2010
81%
2009
81%
2008
79%
2007
86%
2006
83%
2005
74%
2004

Stem Cell Transplants, 1969–2018

The right side of this table lists different types of stem cell transplants. The left side shows how many of each type were performed for Seattle Children’s patients between the years of 1969 and 2018. 

466
Autologous
197
Cord blood
2,459
Malignant diseases
557
Non-malignant diseases
1,696
Matched allogenic
854
Mismatched allogenic
122
Reduced intensity conditioning
822
Unrelated donor

Who do I contact if I have questions?

Talk with your child’s doctor or contact the Cancer and Blood Disorders Center at 206-987-2106.

Updated October 2019.