Clinics

Statistics and Outcomes

Consistently ranked one of the nation's best children’s hospitals by U.S. News and World Report.For more than 25 years, U.S. News & World Report has ranked Seattle Children’s among the nation’s top children’s hospitals, which means your child will be cared for by the very best. We are nationally ranked in all 10 of the individual specialty areas that U.S. News & World Report evaluates, including neonatology, cardiology and heart surgery, nephrology, neurology and neurosurgery, pulmonary and urology.

  • "Outcomes” refer to the results of treatment and evaluate how effective care is. We also provide statistics such as the number of patients seen (volumes). 

    We gather this data to:  

    • Measure the health of our patients
    • Improve the quality of the care we provide
    • Help you make informed decisions about your child’s care 

    Learn more about outcomes at Seattle Children’s.

Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment Volumes and Survival Rates

This table shows the total number of fetal echoes, ultrasounds and fetal MRIs performed by the Fetal Care and Treatment Center team in a given year.

2020*
858
Fetal echoes
214
Ultrasounds
111
Fetal MRIs

*Due to safety restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic, patient volumes were much lower in 2020 compared to typical years

Fetal echocardiograms

These tables show the number of fetal echocardiograms we did in each of the previous 4 years. It also shows how accurate we are in making the diagnosis during pregnancy. Some things cannot be detected before birth due to the differences between blood circulation during pregnancy and after birth.

2020
858
Number of fetal echocardiograms
99%
Accuracy
2019
1,207
Number of fetal echocardiograms
100%
Accuracy
2018
1,064
Number of fetal echocardiograms
99.6%
Accuracy
2017
870
Number of fetal echocardiograms
98.8%
Accuracy

Number of neonatal heart surgeries and 30-day survival rate

These tables show:

  • The rate of patients who survived more than 30 days after surgery (outcome). “30-day survival” is the measurement for success used by hospitals throughout the nation. Using this measurement allows you to compare us with other hospitals.
  • The number (volume) of each type of complex prenatal heart surgery performed at Seattle Children’s Hospital

These data are for procedures performed from July 2015 to June 2019.

  • 97
    Number of surgeries
    100%
    Seattle Children’s 30-day survival rate
    98.3%
    National average 30-day survival rate
  • 51
    Number of surgeries
    100%
    Seattle Children’s 30-day survival rate
    98.9%
    National average 30-day survival rate
  • 55
    Number of surgeries
    90.9%
    Seattle Children’s 30-day survival rate
    87.6%
    National average 30-day survival rate
  • 104
    Number of surgeries
    99%
    Seattle Children’s 30-day survival rate
    98.6%
    National average 30-day survival rate

Single ventricle outcomes

Some complex congenital heart diseases cannot be repaired in the neonatal period and another surgery may be needed later. These include single ventricle congenital heart disease, and complex heart disease that can be repaired once both ventricles are working correctly.

These tables show:

  • The number (volume) of patients by each type of single ventricle defect-related surgery performed at Seattle Children’s Hospital.
  • The rate of patients who survived more than 30 days after surgery (outcome). “30-day survival” is the measurement for success used by hospitals throughout the nation. Using this measurement allows you to compare us with other hospitals.
  • The rate of patients who survived between neonatal surgery and the next stage of surgery (“interstage survival”).
  • The rate of patients who survived past the age of 5 and did not have a heart transplant (5-year transplant-free survival).

These data are for procedures performed from January 2015 to December 2020.

  • 186
    Number of patients
    93.8%
    Seattle Children’s 30-day survival rate
    97.9%
    Seattle Children’s rate of survival between surgeries
    76%
    Seattle Children’s 5-year heart transplant-free survival rate
  • 82
    Number of patients
    96.3%
    Seattle Children’s 30-day survival rate
    96.3%
    Seattle Children’s rate of survival between surgeries
    79%
    Seattle Children’s 5-year heart transplant-free survival rate
  • 44
    Number of patients
    93.2%%
    Seattle Children’s 30-day survival rate

Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) volumes and survival rates

We are a high-volume center for treating congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). National studies have shown that babies with a CDH have better outcomes at centers like Seattle Children’s that treat many babies with this condition.

These data are for procedures performed from 2014 to March 2021.

15 - 20
Average number of patients per year
90%
Seattle Children’s average survival rate
60 - 70%
National average survival rate
  • Our multidisciplinary CDH follow-up clinic provides ongoing evaluation and comprehensive care for children with a CDH to help prevent long-term complications and keep your child healthy. 

    150
    Average number of outpatient clinic visits per year
  • This chart shows the average length of stay for patients with a CDH. Length of stay means the number of days a child was hospitalized.

    Our CDH program treats many high-risk babies who may need to stay in the hospital longer because they require complex care.

    61 days
    Average length of stay at Seattle Children’s
    55 days
    Average length of stay at similar facilities
  • This chart shows the percentage of patients with a CDH who require Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO), and the survival rate for patients who require ECMO.   

    15%
    Percent of Seattle Children’s patients who require ECMO
    30%
    Average national percent of patients who require ECMO
    60%
    Rate of survival for Seattle Children’s patients who require ECMO
    50%
    Average national survival rate for patients who require ECMO

Twin-to-twin transfusion (TTTS) syndrome outcomes

These data are for procedures performed by Seattle Children’s maternal-fetal surgeons from May 2003 through August 2021.

  • During this time, our surgeons treated 575 families with TTTS using fetoscopic laser ablation. We are considered a high-volume center. Research shows that outcomes tend to be better at high-volume centers. We have some of the best outcomes in the country.
  • Most families we treated had babies with stage 3 TTTS (61%).
  • The average gestational age at the time of treatment was 20 weeks, 1 day.
  • The data include families pregnant with twins or, in a small number of cases, triplets.
  • This table shows:

    • The number (volume) of families who had 1 or more babies delivered after fetoscopic laser ablation for TTTS
    • The rate of babies who survived at birth (outcome)
    510
    number of families
    96.5%
    At least 1 baby survived
    75.1%
    2 babies survived
    19.8%
    1 baby survived (others did not)
    3.5%
    0 babies survived
  • Doctors classify TTTS by stage from 1 to 5, with 1 being the least severe and 5 being the most severe.

    These tables show:

    • The number (volume) of families who had 1 or more babies delivered after fetoscopic laser ablation for TTTS. They are grouped by their stage of TTTS at the time of the procedure.
    • The rate of babies who survived at birth (outcome).
    • How our outcomes compare with outcomes from a 2020 meta-analysis (study that combines outcomes from many studies done at other treatment centers)1

    Stage 1

    Seattle Children's vs. Meta-analysis of other centers
    36
    285 - Number of families
    97.2%
    87.4% - at least 1 baby survived
    88.9%
    71.2% - 2 babies survived

    Stage 2

    Seattle Children's vs. Meta-analysis of other centers
    132
    590 - Number of families
    97.7%
    87.1% - at least 1 baby survived
    78.3%
    66.3% - 2 babies survived

    Stage 3

    Seattle Children's vs. Meta-analysis of other centers
    284
    1040 - Number of families
    92.6%
    84.1% - at least 1 baby survived
    72.8%
    51.3% - 2 babies survived

    Stage 4

    Seattle Children's vs. Meta-analysis of other centers
    32
    205 - Number of families
    96.8%
    83.9% - at least 1 baby survived
    64.5%
    57.1% - 2 babies survived

    Stage 5 data are not shown because this stage means 1 or both babies have already passed away.

    1. Di Mascio et al, “Outcome of twin-twin transfusion syndrome according to Quintero stage of disease: systematic review and meta-analysis,” Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, no. 56 (24 April 2020): 811-820, https://doi.org/10.1002/uog.22054.
  • This table shows the average gestational age at delivery (outcome) for babies after fetoscopic laser ablation for TTTS by Seattle Children’s doctors.

    32 weeks, 3 days
    All babies delivered
    32 weeks, 4 days
    Stage 1 or 2 at treatment
    32 weeks, 4 days
    Stage 3 at treatment
    32 weeks, 0 days
    Stage 4 at treatment
  • This table shows the rate of babies delivered before 28 weeks (outcome) after fetoscopic laser ablation for TTTS by Seattle Children’s doctors.

    12.5%
    All babies delivered
    12%
    Stage 1 or 2 at treatment
    12.8%
    Stage 3 at treatment
    12.5%
    Stage 4 at treatment
  • This table shows the rate of miscarriage before 24 weeks (outcome) for families after fetoscopic laser ablation for TTTS by Seattle Children’s doctors.

    2.2%
    All families treated
    2.4%
    Stage 1 or 2 at treatment
    2.35%
    Stage 3 at treatment
    0%
    Stage 4 at treatment

Where does this information come from?

These charts reflect patient numbers (volumes) and include surgical statistics from 2014 to August 2021.

Who do I contact if I have questions?

Talk with your child’s doctor or contact the Fetal Care and Treatment Center.

Related Links

Updated October 2021