Grundner Lab

Lab Team

Claude Beltejar , PhD

Fellow

I received my PhD at the University of Washington, where I used a chemoproteomic approach to study compartmentalized cAMP signaling in T cells. I’m interested in the development and application of mass spectrometry based techniques to study signaling cascades in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. My current efforts in the lab utilize mass spectrometry to identify the substrates of selective kinase inhibitors, as well as the substrates of two novel matrix metalloproteases identified in our lab. 

Vishant Boradia, PhD

Fellow

Vishant BoradiaI am currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Grundner Lab. My research focuses on understanding the fundamental molecular processes in the two most important pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Plasmodium falciparum (Pf). My project aims to identify molecular factors that underlie the non-replicating states of Mtb and Pf. Prior to my current role, I was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Maryland, under Dr. Joao Pedra, where I worked on understanding the molecular relationships between the Tick vector and pathogen in context of autophagy. I received my PhD at the National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, India, under the guidance of Dr. Chaaya Iyengar. My doctoral research demonstrated an entirely novel pathway by which M.tb acquires iron and was also involved in developing a suitable system for the expression and purification of recombinant M.tb proteins. Outside of the lab, I enjoy playing table tennis, dancing, watching sports (only cricket), exploring nature and spending time with family.

Andrew Frando

Graduate research student

I am a graduate student pursuing a career in infectious disease research aiming to earn a doctoral degree. My research focuses on bacterial pathogenesis, and I am currently in the Grundner Lab studying M. tuberculosis. My project focuses on understanding the relationship between phosphosignaling and its role in M. tuberculosis latency.

Neil Fleck

Research scientist I

Neil FleckMy work in the Grundner Lab involves functional identification and characterization of various Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins and pathways using genetic and biochemical techniques.