Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics

Programs and Resources

The Treuman Katz Center serves as a national resource, helping physicians, researchers and policymakers advance their knowledge of bioethics and navigate complex moral dilemmas.

Center Highlights

  • Sconyers/Godfrey Bioethics Grand Rounds

    Join us on January 16, when Dr. Benjamin Wilfond will speak on "Interventions in Infants With Profound Disabilities: Navigating Family Interests and Professional Values."

  • 15th Annual Bioethics Conference

    The Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics hosted its 15th annual conference on July 19–20, 2019. Presentation videos are now available.

Key Partnerships

Partnerships are an essential part of the Treuman Katz Center’s mission. Our researchers collaborate with colleagues across the nation and around the world in pursuit of answers to complex bioethics questions.

Our partners include the Center for Clinical and Translational Research at Seattle Children’s Research Institute and the Department of Bioethics and Humanities and the Institute of Translational Health Sciences at the University of Washington.

Bioethics Consultations

Our bioethicists provide practical guidance to families, providers, researchers and policymakers about patient care, public health and research issues. Our consultation service is available to colleagues throughout Seattle Children’s and the University of Washington, and we offer informal advice to people at outside institutions. Learn more about our services.

Publications

Berkman ER, Clark JD, Diekema DS, Lewis-Newby M. "We Can Do Anything but We Can't Do Everything": Exploring the Perceived Impact of International Pediatric Programs on U.S. PICUs. Frontiers in Pediatrics. 2019 Nov 15;7:470. eCollection 2019.

Garrison NA, Barton KS, Porter KM, Mai T, Burke W, Carroll SR. Access and Management: Indigenous Perspectives on Genomic Data Sharing. Ethnicity & Disease. 2019 Dec 12;29(Suppl 3):659-668. eCollection 2019.

Dionne-Odom JN, Currie ER, Johnston EE, Rosenberg AR. Supporting Family Caregivers of Adult and Pediatric Persons with Leukemia. Seminars in Oncology Nursing. 2019 Dec;35(6):150954. Epub 2019 Nov 18. Review.

Feudtner C, Rosenberg AR, Boss RD, Wiener L, Lyon ME, Hinds PS, Bluebond-Langner M, Wolfe J. Challenges and Priorities for Pediatric Palliative Care Research in the U.S. and Similar Practice Settings: Report From a Pediatric Palliative Care Research Network Workshop. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2019 Nov;58(5):909-917.e3. Epub 2019 Aug 21.

Diekema DS. Decision Making on Behalf of Children: Understanding the Role of the Harm Principle. Journal of Clinical Ethics. 2019 Fall;30(3):207-212.

Armsby AJ, Bombard Y, Garrison NA, Halpern-Felsher BL, Ormond KE. Attitudes of Members of Genetics Professional Societies Toward Human Gene Editing CRISPR Journal. 2019 Oct;2(5):331-339.

MacDuffie KE, Goering S. Neurotechnologies Cannot Seize Thoughts: A Call for Caution in Nomenclature. AJOB Neuroscience. 2019 Jan-Mar;10(1):23-25.

Estes A, Swain DM, MacDuffie KE. The effects of early autism intervention on parents and family adaptive functioning. Pediatric Medicine. 2019 Jun;2. pii: 21.


 

See more publications

Stay Informed

  • Sign up for occasional email updates about the center's research and events.

Our Experts in the Media

  • Helping parents build the skills needed to navigate a child’s cancer – 11/1/19 – The Seattle Times
    A study conducted by Dr. Abby Rosenberg, director of palliative care and resilience research at Seattle Children’s Research Institute, and colleagues showed parents of children with cancer derived strength and resilience from one-on-one support sessions with a novel intervention called Promoting Resilience in Stress Management for Parents (PRISM-P).
  • Intervention helps parents cope, find ‘the good in the bad’ after child’s cancer diagnosis – 10.2.19 – HemOnc Today
    A study conducted by Dr. Abby Rosenberg, director of palliative care and resilience research at Seattle Children’s Research Institute, and colleagues showed parents of children with cancer derived strength and resilience from one-on-one support sessions with a novel intervention called Promoting Resilience in Stress Management for Parents (PRISM-P). Skills imparted through PRISM-P are rooted in previous studies on coping with adversity that Rosenberg conducted with health psychologist Joyce Yi-Frazier. Rosenberg discusses the origins of PRISM-P, its impact on parents and the potential benefit of such coping skills for the entire family.

  • Hiking as a family benefits all ages – 9.24.19 – Charlotte Parent
    The first step toward happy hiking with tots is making sure they’re safe and comfortable. “When planning a hike, a helpful general rule to remember is that a child can hike about as many miles as their age in years,” says avid hiker and wilderness educator Dr. Douglas Diekema, an emergency medicine physician at Seattle Children’s. Young children are more at risk for heat and cold injury than adults, so parents should bring an extra layer for children to wear and remember that babies and toddlers being carried stay cooler, even after you’re warmed up, he says.

  • Study helps parents build resilience to navigate child’s cancer – 9.18.19 – Medical Xpress
    In a study published in JAMA Network Open, Seattle Children’s researchers found that one-on-one sessions teaching skills through a tool called Promoting Resilience in Stress Management for Parents (PRISM-P) improved resilience and benefit finding among parents of children with cancer. “This tells me we are doing what is perhaps most important for parents: helping them to know they can come back again tomorrow and that they can find some good in the bad. These two things will help both them and their families,” said Dr. Abby Rosenberg, a researcher at Seattle Children’s Research Institute and lead author of the study.