Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics

Programs and Resources

The Treuman Katz Center serves as a national resource, helping physicians, researchers and policymakers advance their knowledge of bioethics and navigate complex moral dilemmas.

Center Highlights

Key Partnerships

Partnerships are an essential part of the Treuman Katz Center’s mission. Our researchers collaborate with colleagues across the nation and around the world in pursuit of answers to complex bioethics questions.

Our partners include the Center for Clinical and Translational Research at Seattle Children’s Research Institute and the Department of Bioethics and Humanities and the Institute of Translational Health Sciences at the University of Washington.

Bioethics Consultations

Our bioethicists provide practical guidance to families, providers, researchers and policymakers about patient care, public health and research issues. Our consultation service is available to colleagues throughout Seattle Children’s and the University of Washington, and we offer informal advice to people at outside institutions. Learn more about our services.

Publications

Bogetz JF. Why I Work on Christmas. Journal of Palliative Medicine. 2020 Feb;23(2):294-295.

Diekema DS. Hans Jonas and the Ethics of Human Subjects Research. The Hastings Center Report. 2020 Jan;50(1):8-9.

Duenas DM, Wilfond BS, Johnson LM. Clearing Muddy Waters: The Need to Reconceptualize Minor Increase over Minimal Risk in Pediatric Rare Disease Research. The American Journal of Bioethics. 2020 May;20(4):8-10.

Johnson LM, Duenas DM, Wilfond BS. Ethical Drug Development for Rare Childhood Diseases: When There Are Limited But Promising Data in Adults, How to Choose Between Safety or Efficacy Studies? The American Journal of Bioethics. 2020 May;20(4):111-113..

Kett JC, Cunningham ML, Wightman A. The legacy of language: Disfigurement bias in the NICU. Acta Paediatrica. 2020 May;109(5):880-882.

Kraft SA, Duenas DM, Lewis H, Shah SK. Bridging the Researcher-Participant Gap: A Research Agenda to Build Effective Research Relationships. The American Journal of Bioethics. 2020 Jun;20(5):31-33.

MacDuffie KE, Turner-Brown L, Estes AM, Wilfond BS, Dager SR, Pandey J, Zwaigenbaum L, Botteron KN, Pruett JR, Piven J, Peay HL; IBIS Network ."If He Has it, We Know What to Do": Parent Perspectives on Familial Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Pediatric Psychology. 2020 Mar 1;45(2):121-130.

Bryan MA, Hofstetter AM, Simon TD, Zhou C, Williams DJ, Tyler A, Kenyon CC, Vachani JG, Opel DJ, Mangione-Smith R. Vaccination Status and Adherence to Quality Measures for Acute Respiratory Tract Illnesses. Hospital Pediatrics. 2020 Mar;10(3):199-205.

Statter MB, Noritz G; COMMITTEE ON BIOETHICS, COUNCIL ON CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES. Children With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities as Organ Transplantation Recipients. Pediatrics. 2020 May;145(5). pii: e20200625.

Porter KM, Stevens A, Wilfond BS. Flexibility Required: Balancing the Interests of Children and Risk in Drug Development for Rare Pediatric Conditions. The American Journal of Bioethics. 2020 May;20(4):116-118.  

Lee BM, Trowbridge A, McEvoy M, Wightman A, Kraft SA, Clark JD. Can a Parent Refuse the Brain Death Examination? Pediatrics. 2020 Apr;145(4). pii: e20192340.

Valentine GC, Perez K, Weiss EM. Community Empowerment Through Education: The Inherent Foundation of Promoting Solidarity in Global Health Research. The American Journal of Bioethics. 2020 Jun;20(5):77-79.

Guttmann KF, Wu YW, Juul SE, Weiss EM. Consent Related Challenges for Neonatal Clinical Trials. The American Journal of Bioethics.. 2020 Jun;20(5):38-40.

Wilfond BS, Duenas DM, Johnson LM. Greater Than Minimal Risk, No Direct Benefit - Bridging Drug Trials and Novel Therapy in Pediatric Populations. The American Journal of Bioethics. 2020 May;20(4):102-103.

Wilfond BS. Pediatric Drug Labeling and Imperfect Information. The Hastings Center Report. 2020 Jan;50(1):3.

Janvier A, Farlow B, Barrington KJ, Bourque CJ, Brazg T, Wilfond B. Building trust and improving communication with parents of children with Trisomy 13 and 18: A mixed-methods study. Palliative Medicine. 2020 Mar;34(3):262-271.

Yu JH, Juengst E. Do Groups Have Moral Standing in Unregulated mHealth Research? The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics. 2020 Mar;48(1_suppl):122-128.


 

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Our Experts in the Media

  • Helping parents build the skills needed to navigate a child’s cancer – 11/1/19 – The Seattle Times
    A study conducted by Dr. Abby Rosenberg, director of palliative care and resilience research at Seattle Children’s Research Institute, and colleagues showed parents of children with cancer derived strength and resilience from one-on-one support sessions with a novel intervention called Promoting Resilience in Stress Management for Parents (PRISM-P).
  • Intervention helps parents cope, find ‘the good in the bad’ after child’s cancer diagnosis – 10.2.19 – HemOnc Today
    A study conducted by Dr. Abby Rosenberg, director of palliative care and resilience research at Seattle Children’s Research Institute, and colleagues showed parents of children with cancer derived strength and resilience from one-on-one support sessions with a novel intervention called Promoting Resilience in Stress Management for Parents (PRISM-P). Skills imparted through PRISM-P are rooted in previous studies on coping with adversity that Rosenberg conducted with health psychologist Joyce Yi-Frazier. Rosenberg discusses the origins of PRISM-P, its impact on parents and the potential benefit of such coping skills for the entire family.

  • Hiking as a family benefits all ages – 9.24.19 – Charlotte Parent
    The first step toward happy hiking with tots is making sure they’re safe and comfortable. “When planning a hike, a helpful general rule to remember is that a child can hike about as many miles as their age in years,” says avid hiker and wilderness educator Dr. Douglas Diekema, an emergency medicine physician at Seattle Children’s. Young children are more at risk for heat and cold injury than adults, so parents should bring an extra layer for children to wear and remember that babies and toddlers being carried stay cooler, even after you’re warmed up, he says.

  • Study helps parents build resilience to navigate child’s cancer – 9.18.19 – Medical Xpress
    In a study published in JAMA Network Open, Seattle Children’s researchers found that one-on-one sessions teaching skills through a tool called Promoting Resilience in Stress Management for Parents (PRISM-P) improved resilience and benefit finding among parents of children with cancer. “This tells me we are doing what is perhaps most important for parents: helping them to know they can come back again tomorrow and that they can find some good in the bad. These two things will help both them and their families,” said Dr. Abby Rosenberg, a researcher at Seattle Children’s Research Institute and lead author of the study.