Kelly N Evans, MD

Kelly N Evans, MD

Craniofacial Center

On staff since July 2007

Academic Title: Associate Professor

Research Center: Center for Clinical and Translational Research

"As a resident here at UW/ Seattle Children's, I was fortunate that my training was rooted in a culture of excellence. As a fellow in Craniofacial medicine, I quickly realized that caring for individuals with uncommon and sometimes complex conditions affords an important opportunity to partner with a team and develop our definitions of excellence. Surrounded by a community of passionate providers and researchers, I strive to answer questions that will ultimately translate into improved care for my patients. And I am inspired, each day, to work among a team of colleagues, patients and families aligned towards a common goal."

  • Biography

    Kelly Evans, MD is an attending physician at Seattle Children's Hospital and an acting assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. She completed her clinical fellowship in Craniofacial Medicine at Seattle Children's Hospital in 2012.

    Dr. Evans's research investigates sleep and breathing in children born with craniofacial conditions, with the goal of improving outcomes in patients with conditions that affect airway function. Her current research focuses on children born with micrognathia, glossoptosis and cleft palate, also known as Robin sequence (RS). Her goals include improving the understanding of the RS phenotype, or physical characteristics, identifying risk factors that will be helpful in predicting which children with this condition will have more sleep and breathing problems, and developing tools to guide efficient, safe and high-quality care for children with RS. She is currently also working towards a Masters of Science in Epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Public Health. She has long enjoyed working with and teaching medical students and residents.

    • Related Pages

    • Evans Lab

      The Kelly Evans lab investigates sleep and breathing in children born with craniofacial conditions, with the goal of improving outcomes in patients with conditions affecting the airway’s function.

  • Patient Testimonials
    • Anap Federal Way, WA 02.21.24

      Dr. Evans has been a kind, caring, and excellent doctor to my baby and me. From the first day my baby was admitted in the hospital to this day she has taken care of us tirelessly and kindly. We are grateful to have her and her whole team.

  • Awards and Honors
    Award Name Award Description Awarded By Award Date
    SEATTLE MAGAZINE TOP DOCTOR - 2015 Seattle Magazine 2015
    2014 - 2016
    Fellow Scholarship Recipient David Smith Workshop on Malformations and Morphogenesis 2010
    Corkery Fellowship Travel Grant Award Recipient Seattle Children's Hospital 2009
    Outstanding Resident Teacher- Medical Student Teaching Award University of Washington School of Medicine 2007
    Resident Scholarship, American College of Rheumatology National Conference ACR, Washington, D.C. 2006
    Graduate with Highest Distinction USC Keck School of Medicine 2004
    American Medical Womens Association Janet M. Glasgow Memorial Achievement Citation Recipient USC Keck School of Medicine 2004
    Scholarship to Attend Pediatrics in Yosemite Conference Childrens Hospital Central California 2004
    Jeanette Wilkins, MD, Memorial Award Recipient USC Keck School of Medicine 2004
    Alpha Omega Alpha USC Keck School of Medicine 2003
    Dean's Scholar USC Keck School of Medicine 2001 - 2003
  • Publications

    Other Publications

    • Lee VS, Evans KN, Perez FA, Oron AP, Perkins JA
      Upper Airway Computed Tomography Measures and Receipt of Tracheotomy in Infants With Robin Sequence.
      27254152 JAMA otolaryngology-- head and neck surgery, 2016 Jun 2
    • Wu J, Heike C, Birgfeld C, Evans K, Maga M, Morrison C, Saltzman B, Shapiro L, Tse R
      Measuring Symmetry in Children With Unrepaired Cleft Lip: Defining a Standard for the Three-Dimensional Mid-facial Reference Plane.
      26752127 The Cleft palate-craniofacial journal : official publication of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association, 2016 Jan 11
    • Evans KN, Gruss JS, Khanna PC, Cunningham ML, Cox TC, Hing AV
      Oculoauriculofrontonasal syndrome: case series revealing new bony nasal anomalies in an old syndrome.
      23637006 American journal of medical genetics. Part A, 2013 June : 161A(6)1345-53
    • Luquetti DV, Saltzman BS, Sie KC, Birgfeld CB, Leroux BG, Evans KN, Smartt JM Jr, Tieu DD, Dudley DJ, Heike CL
      Interrater reliability of a phenotypic assessment tool for the ear morphology in microtia.
      23616389 American journal of medical genetics. Part A, 2013 June : 161A(6)1264-72 PMCID:PMC3664118
    • Evans KN, Sie KC, Hopper RA, Glass RP, Hing AV, Cunningham ML
      Robin sequence: from diagnosis to development of an effective management plan.
      21464188 Pediatrics, 2011 May : 127(5)936-48 PMCID:PMC3387866
  • Research Funding
    Grant Title Grantor Amount Award Date
    Sleep and Ecological Factors in Infants with Craniofacial Conditions SCH Clinical Research Scholars Program $50,000 2014 - 2016

Overview

Board Certification(s)

Pediatrics

Medical/Professional School

Keck School of Medicine at USC, Los Angeles, CA

Residency

University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA

Fellowship

University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA

Research Description

Dr. Kelly Evans is an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine and an attending physician at Seattle Children's Hospital. She completed both her pediatric residency and chief residency at Seattle Children's/University of Washington School of Medicine.

Evans's research career began at the University of Washington, where she completed a postdoctoral fellowship in craniofacial medicine. She is currently completing her MS in epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Public Health. Her master's thesis focuses on identification of prenatal and parental risk factors for the development of Robin sequence.