Profile

Daryl M. Okamura, MD

Daryl M. Okamura, MD

Nephrology, Nephrology Research

On staff since October 2002

Academic Title: Associate Professor of Pediatrics

Research Center: Center for Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine

Daryl M. Okamura, MD, is an attending physician at Seattle Children’s and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. He earned his MD and completed his pediatric residency training at the University of Hawaii, after which he completed his pediatric nephrology fellowship at Seattle Children’s.

Dr. Okamura has an active, NIH-funded, basic science research program that is focused on halting and potentially reversing progressive kidney failure through further elucidation of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in renal fibrosis.  Currently, his lab is investigating the role of macrophages in mediating both inflammatory and oxidative pathways and their role in cellular crosstalk with interstitial fibroblasts during chronic kidney injury. His clinical interests include the diagnosis and management of infants, children and adolescents with renal disease, particularly renal vasculitis, hypertension and chronic kidney disease.

Recommendations

  • Milisa Edgemont, SD 11.04.12

    Dr. Okamura was very up front and compassionate in our diagnosis with HSP and IgA Nephropothy. I wholeheartedly recommend Dr. Okamura and his team.

Overview

Board Certification(s)

Pediatric Nephrology

Medical/Professional School

University of Hawaii John A Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu

Residency

Pediatrics, University of Hawaii John A Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu

Fellowship

Pediatric Nephrology, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle

Clinical Interests

Diagnosis and management of infants, children and adolescents with renal disease, particularly renal vasculitis, glomerulonephritis, and chronic kidney disease.

Research Focus Area

Tissue Response to Injury

Publications

  • Okamura DM, Himmelfarb J
    Tipping the redox balance of oxidative stress in fibrogenic pathways in chronic kidney disease.
    Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, Germany) , 2009 Dec. : 2309-19
  • Okamura DM, Pennathur S, Pasichnyk K, López-Guisa JM, Collins S, Febbraio M, Heinecke J, Eddy AA
    CD36 regulates oxidative stress and inflammation in hypercholesterolemic CKD.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN , 2009 Mar. : 495-505
  • Okamura DM, López-Guisa JM, Koelsch K, Collins S, Eddy AA
    Atherogenic scavenger receptor modulation in the tubulointerstitium in response to chronic renal injury.
    American journal of physiology. Renal physiology , 2007 Aug. : F575-85
  • Yamaguchi I, Lopez-Guisa JM, Cai X, Collins SJ, Okamura DM, Eddy AA
    Endogenous urokinase lacks antifibrotic activity during progressive renal injury.
    American journal of physiology. Renal physiology , 2007 July : F12-9
  • Collins SJ, Alexander SL, Lopez-Guisa JM, Cai X, Maruvada R, Chua SC, Zhang G, Okamura DM, Matsuo S, Eddy AA
    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency has renal benefits but some adverse systemic consequences in diabetic mice.
    Nephron. Experimental nephrology , 2006 : e23-34
  • Matsuo S, López-Guisa JM, Cai X, Okamura DM, Alpers CE, Bumgarner RE, Peters MA, Zhang G, Eddy AA
    Multifunctionality of PAI-1 in fibrogenesis: evidence from obstructive nephropathy in PAI-1-overexpressing mice.
    Kidney international , 2005 June : 2221-38

Presentations

Presentations Title Event Location Date
Role of oxidized lipids in progression of chronic kidney disease 8. American Society of Pediatric Nephrology Annual Meeting Baltimore, Maryland May 3, 2009

Research Funding

Grant Title Grantor Amount Award Date
Uncovering CD36-mediated oxidative and inflammatory pathways in progressive renal fibrosis unknown $50,000.00 April 1, 2009
Cysteamine effects on extracellular matrix accumulation in chronic kidney disease Cystinosis Research Foundation Award $89,069.00 July 1, 2008
Role of CD36 in oxidative and inflammatory pathways in renal fibrosis National Kidney Foundation $50,000.00 July 1, 2007
Multifunctional role of CD36 in progressive renal fibrosis unknown $128,250.00 July 1, 2006
Multifunctional role of CD36 in progressive renal fibrosis NIH $35,000.00 July 1, 2004