Current Fellows

Bioethics fellows

  • Emily Berkman, MD (2016–2018)
  • Jessica Jeavons, JD (2016–2018)
  • Jeanne Krick, MD (2016–2018)

Research fellows

  • Stephanie Alessi Kraft, JD
  • Nancy Lau, MA

Alumni

  • Kristi Klee, DNP, MSN, RN-BC (2015–2017)
  • Leah Kroon, MN, RN, CPHON (2015–2017)
  • Tyler Tate, MD (2015–2017)
  • Tracy Brazg, MSW, MPH, MA (2013–2016), while PhD candidate, School of Social Work, University of Washington
    • Brazg is a doctoral candidate at the UW School of Social Work who started her bioethics fellowship in 2013. She is interested in strengthening the connections between social work and bioethics, in terms of scholarship, teaching and interprofessional practice. She is examining the concept of patient advocacy in social work compared to in clinical bioethics. Her master’s degree project was “Leveling the Playing Field in Clinical Ethics Consultation: A Place for Patient Advocacy.”
    • “My participation in the clinical bioethics fellowship program allowed me to put my classroom learning into practice, and to develop the unique skillset required of a clinical bioethicist. Through the training and mentorship I received as a fellow, I have gained a strong understanding of how ethical principles apply in healthcare delivery, I have exercised my ability to think critically, I have become a better listener and more confident in my ability to constructively engage with teams, patients and families during times of conflict. Few social workers have the opportunity to receive this kind of formal training in bioethics. For this reason, I feel exceptionally privileged that I was afforded the chance to train amongst an impressive group of colleagues and in a dynamic and respected center for bioethics.”
     
  • Kate Gentry, MD, MA (2013–2016), while acting assistant professor, Department of Anesthesia, University of Washington School of Medicine
    • Dr. Gentry is an attending pediatric anesthesiologist and faculty member in the Department of Anesthesiology who started her bioethics fellowship in 2013. Her research interests include the informed consent process for anesthesia and provider-parent-child communication in general. She is designing an empirical project studying how anesthesia providers communicate with families pre-operatively.
    • “The bioethics fellowship opened my eyes to the multitude of complex ethical and communication issues that arise in the delivery of pediatric healthcare. The training has prepared me to recognize and respond to conflict, mediate discussions and seek resolutions that are amenable to all parties. The combination of clinical training and research mentorship provided by the fellowship, plus a comprehensive curriculum provided by the University of Washington master’s program, has prepared me to forge a path as an academic anesthesiologist–ethicist. Finally, this experience has taught me that I will never be done learning. As medicine advances and societal norms shift, new questions will continue to emerge, and I look forward to grappling with those issues.”
     
  • Daniel Benedetti, MD (2014–2015)
    Current Position: Clinical Fellow in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts
    • Dr. Benedetti completed one year of the bioethics fellowship. During that year, he conducted an empirical research project examining communication at the time of a cancer diagnosis in pediatric patients in the context of family refusal of recommended treatment.
     
  • Jennifer Kett, MD, MA (2012–2014)
    Current Position: Palliative Care Physician, Pediatric Complex Care Support Team at Mary Bridge Children's Hospital, Tacoma, Washington
    • Dr. Kett is a neonatologist and palliative medicine physician. Her research interests include prenatal counseling with families facing the birth of a critically ill infant and the impact of multidisciplinary fetal diagnostic and treatment centers on these families. Her master’s degree project was “The Prenatal Consultation for Extremely Preterm Neonates.”
    • “Each day I am confronted with patients, families and clinicians facing extremely challenging situations and difficult choices. My experience as a bioethics fellow has been invaluable in this context. As a direct result of my training, I am better able to help the team navigate challenging discussions about which interventions should be offered to a particular family and better able to assist and support families as they make difficult choices about what to do for their children. I am so grateful for this unique experience and the mentors and colleagues that I will maintain for life.”
     
  • Aaron Wightman, MD, MA (2012–2014) with Pediatric Nephrology Fellowship
    Current Position: Assistant Professor, Division of Nephology and Division of Bioethics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine; and faculty, Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics, Seattle Children’s Research Institute, Seattle, Washington
    • Dr. Wightman's research interests focus on decision-making for children with incurable conditions; decision- making in families with infants with end-stage kidney disease; candidacy for solid organ transplant; and resource allocation in care for children with chronic conditions. His master’s degree project was “Neurodevelopmental Status as Criteria for Pediatric Solid Organ Transplantation Eligibility.”
    • “My training as a fellow at the Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics has helped me build a unique niche within my specialty, pursue challenging research questions and provide effective ethics consultations.”
     
  • Jessica Turnbull, MD, MA (2011–2013) with Pediatric Critical Care Fellowship
    Current Position: Assistant Professor, Division of Pediatric Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; and faculty, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society, Institute for Medicine and Public Health, Nashville, Tennessee 
    • Dr. Turnbull completed the bioethics fellowship concurrently with her pediatric critical care fellowship in 2013. Her master’s degree project was “Determining Eligibility Criteria for Pediatric Extracorporeal Life Support: How Do Physicians Decide?” She is interested in applying qualitative research methods to study decision-making for medically complex children, as well as improving palliative care delivery in the pediatric intensive care unit.
    • “I feel very lucky to have trained with the Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics and to have pursued my master’s in bioethics at the University of Washington. My additional training in the field of pediatric bioethics has allowed me to fill a specific niche in the Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine and the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt. I not only put the skills gained during that time to use in the care of my own patients, but also in educating staff and trainees, as well as supporting my colleagues’ decision-making processes when faced with ethical dilemmas.” 
     
  • Jennifer Guon, JD, MA (2010–2012)
    Current Position: Compliance and Privacy Officer, Kaiser Permanente, Panorama City, California
    • Ms. Guon assures compliance with accreditation and agency standards pertaining to clinical ethics and patient rights and reviews and assists in the development of regional policies related to patient rights and bioethics.
     
  • Jonna Derbenwick Clark, MD, MA (2009–2011) with Pediatric Critical Care Fellowship
    Current Position: Assistant Professor, Division of Pediatric Critical Care and Division of Bioethics, University of Washington School of Medicine; and faculty, Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics, Seattle Children’s Research Institute, Seattle, Washington
  • Mitzi L. Murray, MD, MA (2009–2011) with Medical Genetics Fellowship
    Current Position: Clinical Assistant Professor, Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Medicine and Department of Pathology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington
  • Douglas Opel, MD, MPH (2006–2009)
    Current Position: Assistant Professor, Division of Bioethics and Division of General Pediatrics Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine; and faculty, Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics, Seattle Children’s Research Institute, Seattle, Washington