The Center for Global Infectious Disease Research's members have expertise in a wide spectrum of specialties including adolescent medicine, virology and bacteriology. Their projects aim to make discoveries and implement new solutions to help children and their parents avoid and recover from infections.

The CGIDR's research areas include:

Virology

Bacteriology

Research Labs

Frenkel Lab

FrenkelThe Frenkel Lab focuses on key questions related to HIV. The lab aims to: understand the mechanisms that allow HIV to persist during antiretroviral therapy; develop practical, affordable tests to detect drug-resistant HIV; make insights into reservoirs of drug-resistant HIV and illuminate the pathogenesis of HIV-related diseases.

Hernandez Lab

Rafael HernandezThe Hernandez Lab uses a combination of genetics, molecular biology, cell culture models and animal models to probe the interactions between mycobacterial pathogens and host immune cells. The lab’s goal is to make insights that lead to new strategies to improve the efficacy and shorten the duration of antibiotic regimens for mycobacterial infections.

Katzenellenbogen Lab

Rachel KThe Katzenellenbogen Lab studies the mechanism by which high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) activates telomerase (an enzyme found normally in stem cells that is almost categorically activated in cancers) in order to understand how HPV drives cells to become malignant. The lab also studies how high-risk HPV disrupts the normal regulation of growth and differentiation pathways in its host cells.

Rajagopal Lab

Lakshmi Rajagopal 70x70The Rajagopal Lab utilizes genetic, molecular, biochemical and proteomic approaches to study infectious diseases caused by bacteria. The lab focuses on the human pathogens B Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus.

Rose Lab

Tim Rose 70x70The Rose Lab focuses on the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8 and its transmission and pathogenic role in AIDS-related malignancies.

Weissman Lab

Weissman ScottAs antibiotic-resistant bacteria pose a growing public health threat, the Weissman Lab is studying how these bacteria emerge and developing innovative ways to identify and monitor them.