The Center for Global Infectious Disease Research's members include experts in understanding, treating and preventing infectious disease.

Leadership

Lisa Frenkel, MD

LisaFrenkelDr. Lisa Frenkel is co-director of the Center for Global Infectious Disease Research at Seattle Children's Research Institute; a professor of pediatric infectious diseases, laboratory medicine and global health at the University of Washington; and co-director of Seattle Children's pediatric infectious diseases and virology clinic .

The Frenkel lab 's current research includes: 

  • Developing practical, affordable ways to prevent mother-infant HIV transmission
  • Identifying the mechanisms that cause adults to shed HIV in the genital tract, placing babies at risk of infection during birth
  • Understanding viral factors related to HIV transmission
  • Treating drug-resistant HIV in children and adults

Timothy Rose, PhD

TimRoseDr. Timothy Rose is co-director of the Center for Global Infectious Disease Research at Seattle Children's Research Institute, a professor of pediatrics and pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Washington and a UW adjunct professor in the departments of epidemiology, microbiology and oral health sciences.

The Rose lab's research focuses on the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8 (KSHV/HHV8) and its transmission and pathogenic role in AIDS-related malignancies. Current research areas include:

  • Identification and characterization of cellular receptors mediating KSHV infection
  • Cell-cell transmission of KSHV infections
  • Comparative analysis of KSHV and its simian homologs and their role in tumor induction associated with HIV-induced immunosuppression
  • Characterization of latency and the activating switch to herpesvirus replication
  • Development of diagnostic tests for known and emerging viruses of global health importance

Members

Marta Bull, PhD

MarthaBullDr. Marta Bull is an investigator in the Center for Global Infectious Disease Research and a research assistant professor of pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Washington.

Her primary research interest includes HIV at mucosal sites, primarily but not limited to the female genital tract. Her interest in the genital tract is threefold:

  • Better define immunological milieu at mucosal sites and how this pertains to HIV persistence at these sites
  • Better define the viral dynamics and exchange between the genital tract, blood and other tissues
  • Evaluate the role of other chronic viruses - such as herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1, HSV-2, cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus - in HIV persistence

Specific areas currently under study include the cellular populations associated with HIV shedding from the female genital tract, and immune mechanisms that promote HIV persistence at tissue sites as a barrier to an HIV cure.

Serge Barcy, PhD

SergeBarcyDr. Serge Barcy is an investigator in the Center for Global Infectious Disease Research and a research assistant professor of pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Washington.

Barcy's research focuses on identifying the immune correlates in the oral mucosa involved with control of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8) infection and impact of HIV, especially in pediatric populations in sub-Saharan Africa.

Jane Burns, MD

JaneBurnsDr. Jane Burns is an investigator in the Center for Global Infectious Disease Research and a professor of pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Washington.

Research in the Burns lab focuses on cystic fibrosis microbiology and the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis infections. Burns also directs the Center for Cystic Fibrosis Microbiology , a Therapeutics Development Center core laboratory that works with investigators and pharmaceutical companies to develop new antibiotics for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, and manages a nationally funded, institute-wide core facility to provide cystic fibrosis clinical isolates to interested academic researchers.

Rachel A. Katzenellenbogen, MD

Rachel KatzenellenbogenDr. Rachel Katzenellenbogen is an investigator in the Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, an attending physician in adolescent medicine at Seattle Children's Hospital and an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington.

Research in the Katzenellenbogen lab centers on human papillomavirus (HPV), which is the most common sexually transmitted infection, affecting more than 75% of the adult population. HPV infections are linked to cervical cancer and other cancers, and are categorized as high-risk or low-risk. Katzenellenbogen's team studies high-risk HPV infections and is currently investigating the mechanism by which high-risk HPV activates telomerase, an enzyme that is found normally in stem cells and is almost categorically activated in cancers. This research could lead to a new understanding of how HPV drives cells to become malignant.

Lakshmi Rajagopal, PhD

Lakshmi RajagopalDr. Lakshmi Rajagopal is a principal investigator in the Center for Global Infectious Disease Research and an associate professor of pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Washington. She also has adjunct faculty appointments in the UW Departments of Microbiology and Global Health, and is a full faculty member of the UW's Molecular and Cellular Biology PhD program.

The Rajagopal lab 's research focuses on bacteria that cause perinatal infections that are associated with stillbirth and prematurity. She has a particular interest in the Group B streptococcus and staphylococcus aureus pathogens. Although both GBS and S. aureus are commensal organisms, these bacteria can also become disease-causing pathogens.

Thor A. Wagner, MD

ThorWagnerDr. Thor Wagner is an investigator in the Center for Global Infectious Disease Research and an assistant professor of pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Washington.

His research focuses on pediatric HIV infection, which accounts for 15% of all HIV deaths. Wagner's primary interest is in understanding chronic HIV infection during antiretroviral therapy - and why antiretroviral therapy doesn't eradicate HIV infection. Is there ongoing viral replication? Is there proliferation of cells with viable proviral HIV? Can we identify the remaining infected cells? Is immune tolerance to HIV a barrier to curing HIV? Answers to these questions should help design new treatment strategies that are more likely to cure HIV.

Scott Weissman, MD

Scott WeissmanDr. Scott Weissman is an investigator in the Center for Global Infectious Disease Research and an assistant professor of pediatric infectious disease at the University of Washington.

The Weissman lab studies the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance among bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, that infect pediatric patients. Weissman and his collaborators developed a faster, more economical method - a two-locus typing known as CH typing - of identifying E. coli strains. Weissman is also part of a team that's developing an Internet-based surveillance system to monitor outbreaks of antibiotic-resistant bacteria worldwide.