Funded in part by the Lynn Taylor Staheli Endowed Chair in Pediatric Orthopedics, our growing research program is discovering better ways to diagnose and care for muscular and skeletal conditions in children. Learn about current research studies taking place in our Orthopedics Department.

Spine and Chest

Lung Function in Children with Early Onset Scoliosis: Effect of Body Position

What is the goal of this study?

The goal of this study is to find out if children with early onset scoliosis experience a change in lung function based on their body position.

What will happen if my child takes part in this study?

If you chose to take part, your child will have lung function testing performed in two positions: while lying down and in the upright position. These tests would be done during a 90-minute visit at Seattle Children's.

Who can join the study?

This study is for patients who:

  • Are 7 years old or older
  • Have been diagnosed with early onset scoliosis
  • Have had lung function testing done before

For more information, email the research coordinator.

Spine and Chest Wall Deformity Registries

What is the goal of this study?

The Spine and Chest Wall Deformity Registries collect medical information about children with spine and chest wall deformities. Information entered in this database will help researchers learn more about these conditions, outcomes of care and which treatments are most helpful.

What will happen if my child takes part in this study?

If you chose to take part, researchers would review your child’s medical chart to collect information about their specific condition and what treatments your child has had. You might be asked to fill out a survey about your child’s health. The survey takes about 10 minutes to complete and will be given to you at your regular orthopedic visit at Seattle Children’s.

Who can join the study?

This study is for patients who have a spine and/or chest wall deformity.

For more information, email the research coordinator.

Sports Concussion

Cortical GABA in Pediatric Sports Concussion

What is the goal of this study?

The goal of this study is to measure levels of a neurotransmitter in the brain (called GABA) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in people who have had a concussion recently. Researchers want to see if GABA is different in people who have had a concussion.

What will happen if my child takes part in this study?

If your child takes part in this study, they will have an MRI of their brain. An MRI takes about 1 hour and will be done at Seattle Children's. Your child also has the option to undergo memory, learning and behavioral testing. These tests also take about 1 hour.

Who can join the study?

This study is for patients who:

  • Are 14 to 18 years old
  • Have recently had their first concussion

For more information, email the research coordinator.

Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors

Sarcobase: A Clinical Database for Patients with Bone or Soft Tissue Tumors

What is the goal of this study?

The goal of this study is to learn more about where bone and soft tissue tumors start in the body and how well different treatments work.

What will happen if my child takes part in this study?

Researchers will collect information about your child’s condition and past treatments from their medical chart. This information will be put into a database called Sarcobase. Researchers use information in the database for future studies. You might be asked to fill out surveys about your child’s health. Your child might also be asked to wear a step monitor to record their activity.

Who can join the study?

This study is for patients who have a bone or soft tissue tumor.

For more information, email the research coordinator.

Dysplasia

Skeletal Dysplasia: Clinical Registry

What is the goal of this study?

The goal of this study is to help us understand the history of patients with skeletal dysplasia or other rare bone conditions, the outcome of their care and their quality of life. Our researchers have created a registry (a database) to collect information about these patients.

What will happen if my child takes part in this study?

Researchers will collect information about your child’s diagnosis and past treatments from their medical chart. You may also be asked to complete a survey about their health. The survey takes approximately 10 minutes to complete and will be given to you at your child’s regular orthopedic office visits.

Who can join the study?

This study is for patients who have skeletal dysplasia or a rare bone condition.

For more information, email the research coordinator.

Limb Deformities

Registries for Children with Congenital Upper Limb Differences

What is the goal of this study?

The goal of this study is to collect information about children born with hand or arm differences. We hope the information will help us learn more about the quality of life of children with limb differences and find better ways to care for them.

What will happen if my child takes part in this study?

Researchers will collect information about your child’s hand or arm difference from your child’s medical chart. You may also be asked to fill out surveys to tell us more about your child’s day-to-day life. Each survey takes about 10 minutes to complete.

Who can join the study?

This study is for patients who:

  • Are younger than 18 years old
  • Have an upper limb difference

For more information, email the research coordinator.

Registry of Children with Acquired and Congenital Limb Deficiencies

What is the goal of this study?

The goal of this study is to collect information about children with leg and foot deficiencies to learn more about their day-to-day lives. We hope to use this information to provide better care for patients with leg and foot deficiencies in the future.

What will happen if my child takes part in this study?

Researchers will collect information about your child’s condition. You may be asked to fill out surveys to tell us more about how your child lives their life. Each survey takes about 10 minutes to complete.

Who can join the study?

This study is for patients who:

  • Are younger than 21 years old
  • Were born with a missing leg or foot

For more information, email the research coordinator.

Fractures

Treatment of Toddler’s Fractures

What is the goal of this study?

The goal of this study is to compare two types of common treatments for toddler’s fractures, which is when the shinbone gets broken. The two treatments that will be compared are the long leg cast and the removable boot.

What will happen if my child takes part in this study?

If you choose to take part in this study, your child will be treated with either a long leg cast or a removable boot for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks, your child will be seen in the orthopedic clinic at Seattle Children’s for a follow-up visit and X-ray. You will be asked to fill out three surveys about your child’s experience with the treatment: one at the beginning of the study, one at your follow-up visit and one 8 weeks after treatment.

Who can join the study?

This study is for patients who:

  • Are between 1 and 3 years old
  • Have been diagnosed with toddler’s fracture

For more information, email the research coordinator.