Since the TRIPP program began in 2012, these funds have been used to support a wide variety of research. Below are descriptions of each project as stated at the time of the award.

2015 TRIPP Recipients

Evelyn Hsu, MD

Examination of Liver Offers to Pediatric Candidates on the Liver Transplant Wait-List: Creating and Validating a Decision Support Tool to Improve Patient Outcomes

Since 2002, pediatric patients on the liver wait-list have been prioritized by a MELD (Model for End-Stage Liver Disease) or PELD (Pediatric End-Stage Liver Disease) score. When a liver graft becomes available, it is offered to the child of highest priority on the wait-list, and depending upon a number of factors, this offer may be accepted or rejected. Using data from the national United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) registry, Dr. Hsu and her team will identify factors associated with the decision to decline a liver offer for pediatric liver transplant candidates, and develop and validate a decision support tool that will improve the outcomes of children undergoing liver transplantation.

Jennifer Rabbitts, MBChB

Persistent Pain and Poor HRQOL related to Pediatric Surgery: Child, Parent and Provider Perspectives

Over one million children undergo in-patient surgery in the United States each year. Postsurgical pain persists over time for a large portion of children, and is associated with poor health outcomes. Interventions have not yet been developed to address pain and poor long-term health outcomes because of knowledge gaps in the reasons for pain and poor health. The objective of this pilot project is to understand family psychosocial needs related to the experience of major pediatric surgery to develop a family-based psychosocial intervention. Dr. Rabbitts and team will accomplish this by conducting a qualitative study to collect information from children who have undergone recent major surgery, their families and their healthcare providers. Information collected will inform an NIH grant to develop and test a family-based psychosocial intervention for children at risk for pain and poor health outcomes after major surgery.

2014 TRIPP Recipients

Susan Apkon, MD, MS and Kristie Bjornson, PhD, PT, PCS

Ankle Foot Orthoses - Footwear Combinations: Biomechanics and Walking Activity in Cerebral Palsy

Maida Chen, MD and Tonya Palermo, PhD

A Feasibility Trial of Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) in Adolescents with and without Chronic Pain

Kenneth Schenkman, MD, PhD and Doug Hawkins, MD

Muscle Oxygenation as an Indicator for Red Blood Cell Transfusion Need

Raymond Tse, MD

Computer-Based Objective Assessment of Cleft Lip Nasal Severity and Treatment Success Using 3D Stereophotogrammetry

2013 TRIPP Recipients

Eileen Klein, MD, MPH and Doug Opel, MD, MPH

Parental Vaccine Hesitancy and Acceptance of Seasonal Influenza Vaccine in the Pediatric Emergency Department

Jonathan Perkins, DO and Mark Majesky, PhD

Propranolol Induced Changes in microRNA Expression in Specific Infantile Hemangioma Cells

Danielle Zerr, MD, MPH and David Suskind, MD

Planning a Trial of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Patients with Recurrent Infections due to Enterobacteriaceae Resistant to Broad-spectrum Antibiotics

David Suskind, MD

Treatment with the Specific Carbohydrate Diet for Children with Active Crohn’s Disease or Ulcerative Colitis

2012 TRIPP Recipients

Seth Friedman, PhD and Daniel Miller, MD, PhD

Correlation of MRI Findings with Molecular Changes in FSHD-affected Individuals

Luke Hoffman, MD, PhD and Jane Burns, MD

Staphylococcus Aureus Small-colony Variants: Optimal Testing and Treatment

Eileen Klein, MD, MPH and Janet Englund, MD

Rhinovirus Detection in Symptomatic Pediatric Patients: Implication for Patient Care

Jonathan Perkins, DO and Mark Majesky, PhD

Propranolol Induced Changes in microRNA Expression in Specific Infantile Hemangioma Cells

Christian Roth, MD and Cate Pihoker, MD

Testing Satiety Responses in Obese Children

Danielle Zerr, MD, MPH

Frequency and Duration of Intestinal Carriage and Bacterial Evolution over Time in Pediatric Patients with Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Infections