Center for Clinical and Translational Research

The Center for Clinical and Translational Research (CCTR) plays an integral role in transforming scientific discoveries into real-world therapies that prevent and treat childhood illness and improve the quality of children’s daily lives. Learn more about the CCTR.

Programs and Resources for Researchers

CCTR’s programs, facilities and services help ensure researchers within the center – and throughout Children’s – have the means and the opportunity to conduct safe, efficient, and ethical research involving children.

Featured Research

  • Dietary Therapy for IBD

    New research at Seattle Children's demonstrates that the Specific Carbohydrate Diet can induce clinical remission in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's... cont.

Stay Informed

Publications

Participate

Help us answer questions about childhood health and illness, and help other children in the future. See a list of our current research studies.

In the News

  • Kids learn to cook food they can eat
    06.04.2017 – Seattle Times

    Kids diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) learned how to cook graham crackers for s’mores using honey and coconut flour during a specific carbohydrate diet (SCD) cooking-group activity at Seattle Children’s on Sunday, June 4. Dr. David Suskind participated with his patients in cooking the IBD-friendly treats.
  • 17th Annual Top Doctors
    05.09.2017 – Seattle Magazine
    For the 17th annual report on the Puget Sound area’s most trusted physicians, Seattle Magazine went straight to the experts and asked Seattle-area doctors to recommend their peers. The report includes 60 active internal medical staff from Seattle Children’s and 27 active community, consulting or affiliate medical staff. Drs. Susan Apkon, Richard Ellenbogen, Patrick Healey, Kathleen Meyers, Karen Murray, Bonnie Ramsey and Delphine Yung are a few of the providers included in the report.
  • FDA approval of hepatitis C drugs for kids is likely to speed treatment
    04.19.2017 – NPR

    With the approval this month of two drugs to treat hepatitis C in children, these often overlooked victims of the opioid epidemic have a better chance at a cure. Kids may have an easier time than adults getting treatment approved, some experts say. Children often come to clinicians’ attention when their regular pediatrician learns the mother is infected with hepatitis C, said Dr. Karen Murray, which had several children in the trials.