Patient receiving an echocardiogram, congenital heart disease

Due to advances in diagnosis and care, more than 85% of children with congenital heart disease survive to adulthood, which has resulted in a new and rapidly growing population that requires specialty care.

Because of advances in diagnosis and care, more than 85% of children with congenital heart disease survive to adulthood. This has resulted in a new and rapidly growing population that requires specialty care. The researchers at the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development are studying the issues facing adolescents and young adults with congenital heart disease as they transition into adult-oriented medical care. One area we are looking at is the prevalence of depression and anxiety among young adults with congenital heart disease.

Some of our ongoing projects studying the social/lifestyle and healthcare concerns these patients encounter as adults include:

  • An epidemiologic study of the patient populations at 20 adult congenital heart disease centers across the United States
  • Participation in a national multicenter research group studying late outcomes in patients with tetralogy of Fallot and stress testing to predict outcomes of pregnant women with complex congenital heart disease
  • Prevalence of depression and anxiety among young adults with congenital heart disease.

We will soon begin projects that:

  • Evaluate the process and methods of transitioning adolescents to adult-oriented medical care
  • Evaluate barriers to finding adult healthcare providers and educational materials for adolescents and young adults
  • Collect information on pregnant women with heart conditions through participation in an international database