The Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development is conducting clinical studies that help researchers understand and explore new treatments for a variety of child health conditions.

Participants in these studies can take advantage of new therapies before they are widely available and help others by contributing to research. To find about more about the clinical studies process, and its potential benefits and risks, read more about research studies and clinical trials.

To learn about the CHBD’s studies, select a condition below to see a list of studies that are enrolling participants or are underway but not currently enrolling. If you don’t see a study that fits your needs, ask your doctor or nurse for help finding studies that might be right for your child.

Clinical studies by condition:

Asthma

Improving Asthma Outcomes Through Spirometry Distance Learning (Rita Mangione-Smith, MD, MPH)

Medical Condition/Therapy: Asthma

Status: Active, not recruiting

Contact: Email Linda Shih  

Description: Misclassification of asthma severity occurs when assessment is based on symptoms alone. This misclassification can lead to inadequate treatment, increased morbidity, and increased healthcare utilization/cost.

This study’s goal is to test the effectiveness of a distance learning quality improvement program called Spirometry 360, developed by the Interactive Medical Training Resources (iMTR) group at the University of Washington Child Health Institute. Spirometry, a simple breathing test that measures lung function, is a recommended component of asthma diagnosis and treatment in the primary care setting, yet few providers routinely use it for children with asthma. The Spirometry 360 program aims to improve care for children with asthma by enhancing provider knowledge and self-efficacy related to the use and interpretation of office-based spirometry. Learn more.

Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Sequencing Treatments for Mothers with ADHD and Their At-Risk Children ( “Treating Mothers First”)

Medical Condition/Therapy: ADHD

Status: Recruiting/enrolling

Contact: Email Libby Bliss or call 206-884-1488

Description: Young children of mothers with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at heightened risk for ADHD by virtue of genetics and family environment. Maternal ADHD is associated with difficulties parenting effectively and a decreased response to evidence-based behavioral parent training interventions. Many questions remain regarding to how best to treat families in which the mother has ADHD. This study assesses whether mothers with ADHD and their children benefit by treating mothers first using stimulant medication, behavioral parent training or a combination of both. It will also examine whether there is a difference in the order of treatment mothers receive (e.g., medication first or parent training first).

The Effects of ADHD Medication Study (TEAM Study)

Medical Condition/Therapy: ADHD

Status: Recruiting/enrolling

Contact: Email Sophie Shonka or call 206-884-7838

Description: Seattle Children’s researcher Mark Stein, PhD, is conducting an IRB-approved research study about ADHD medication. We are studying response to medication in children with ADHD and ADD. The study will last for 12 weeks and you will be paid for your time and travel. You child may be able to join if he or she is between the ages of 7 and 11, has attention problems and has not previously taken medications for ADHD or ADD.

Treating Fathers with ADHD and Their At-Risk Children (Fathers Too)

Medical Condition/Therapy: Autism, ADHD

Status: Recruiting/enrolling

Contact: Email Libby Bliss or call 206-884-1488

Description: Dr. Mark Stein is conducting a study about ADHD and fathers. The study will include an assessment for adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Treatment for fathers with ADHD (either medication or parent training sessions under the supervision of a trained clinician specializing in ADHD) will be provided.

You must be a father, and must:

  • Be between 21–55 years old
  • Have ADHD or problems paying attention and concentrating
  • Have a child between 3 and 8 years old at risk for ADHD
  • Be the child’s biological father

The study will last for 10 weeks.

Quillivant XR in Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A Pilot Study (ASD/ADHD Study)

Medical Condition/Therapy: Autism, ADHD

Status: Recruiting/enrolling

Contact: Email Sophie Shonka or call 206-884-7838

Description: Seattle Children's researchers Mark Stein, PhD, and Soo-Jeong Kim, MD, are conducting an IRB-approved research study about autism and ADHD. We are looking for 25 children to join the study. The study will measure the effects of an FDA-approved drug, Quillivant XR, on ADHD symptoms in children who have autism spectrum disorder with attention problems. The study will last for 6 weeks. Your child may be able to join if he or she is between the ages of 5 and 16 and has a clinical diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder and attention problems. The study will provide an ADHD evaluation and an autism evaluation (if necessary).

Autism

Gender Exploration of Neurogenetics and Development to Advance Autism Research (GENDAAR)

Medical Condition/Therapy: Autism spectrum disorders

Status: Enrolling

Contact: Email Desiree Gulliford or call 206-884-7814

Description: Dr. Sara Webb is looking for girls and boys with ASD between the ages of 8–17 years old to participate in a new study exploring gender differences in autism spectrum disorders. The study involves two to three half-day visits to Seattle Children’s, which will include:

  • Functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) to take pictures of your child’s brain
  • A blood draw for DNA analysis
  • EEG to record the electrical signals of your child’s brain
  • Assessment of your child’s cognitive, language and social skills

We will also ask you to answer questions regarding your child’s behavior and development. You will receive payment for your participation. This study is being conducted by a collaboration of researchers at Seattle Children’s Research Institute, Yale University, UCLA and Harvard University, and is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

JAKE: A Study to Assess the Janssen Autism Knowledge Engine (JAKE) in Children and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Medical Condition/Therapy: Autism 

Status: Recruiting/enrolling

Contact: Email Denise Ward 

Description: The JAKE study is being conducted in order to develop a system that helps to measure physical and behavioral outcomes of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It is a computer-based system that involves the use of electronic assessments and biosensors, amongst other measures. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the usability of the Janssen Autism Knowledge Engine (JAKE) as a system to monitor clinical outcomes in ASD. We are looking for participants 6 years and older. This study is noninvasive and study participants will continue taking his or her prescribed or non-prescribed ASD treatment and therapies during this study. The total study duration for each study participant will last for approximately 8–10 weeks. You will be compensated for your time. Learn more (PDF).

Social Reward in Autism: Electrophysiological, Clinical and Behavioral Correlates

Medical Condition/Therapy: Autism

Status: Recruiting/enrolling

Contact: Email Dr. Emily Neuhaus  

Description: The goal of this study is to learn how the brain responds to different kinds of rewards and how that relates to social and communication skills for children with or without ASD. We’re looking for 8-to-12-year-old children with or without an autism spectrum disorder. The study includes one lab visit of three to four hours, plus questionnaires and phone calls at the start of the study and at a later time. The lab visit will include using EEG to measure brain activity during a computer game, plus other games and activities.

Studying the Physiology of Attention and Regulation in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (SPARCS)

Medical Condition/Therapy: Autism spectrum disorders

Status: Active, not recruiting

Contact: Email SPARCS or call 206-884-1267

Description: Dr. Sara Webb is looking for 1-to-4-year-old children with typical development to participate in a study on attention, regulation, and development. We will monitor your child’s heart rate while they watch movies and play games in two or three 2-hour visits to Seattle Children’s Research Institute in downtown Seattle, and parents will be asked to complete questionnaires and interviews. We will do one follow-up visit plus questionnaires and phone calls 6 months and 1 year later. Free developmental evaluations will be provided, and you will receive $25 and parking compensation for each visit.

Study of Oxytocin in Autism to Improve Reciprocal Social Behaviors (SOARS-B)

Medical Condition/Therapy: Autism

Status: Recruiting/enrolling

Contact: Email Christine Rubery  

Description: The purpose of this research study is to learn about the effects of intranasal oxytocin as a supplemental treatment for improving social difficulties in children and adolescents, ages 3 to 17, with autism. This study will also provide additional information about the safety and tolerability of intranasal oxytocin. During the first six months of the study, participants will be randomly assigned to take either placebo or active oxytocin. During the second six months, all participants will take active oxytocin. Study participants will come to Seattle Children’s for visits once a month for 12 months with one follow-up visit at 18 months. Learn more.

Vasopressin Antagonist to Improve Social Communication in Autism (Vanilla Study)

Medical Condition/Therapy: Autism

Status: Recruiting/enrolling

Contact: Email Denise Ward  

Description: The Vanilla study will measure the effects of an investigational drug called BP28420 on social behavior, communication and safety in adult males with autism. Eligible participants are adult males ages 18 to 35 who have been diagnosed with autism. Eligible participants will come to Seattle Children’s once a week over the course of about 12 weeks for study visits, with one follow-up visit at week 18. Participants will be given either the investigational drug or a placebo during study participation. Participants will need a caregiver to come with them to each study visit. Learn more.

Zeroing in on the Examination of Brain and Behavior Research in Autism (ZEBRA)

Medical Condition/Therapy: Autism spectrum disorders

Status: Enrolling

Contact: Email rablab@uw.edu or call 206-616-2889

Description: Drs. Raphael Bernier and Sara Webb are looking for boys and girls with ASD between the ages of 8 and 17 years old to participate in a new study exploring how genetic differences impact brain and behavior in ASD. The study involves two 4-hour visits to the University of Washington, which will include:

  • EEG to record your child’s brain activity
  • Assessment of your child’s cognitive, language, and social skills
  • 2D and 3D photos of your child
  • A blood draw for DNA analysis

We will also ask you to answer questions regarding your child’s behavior and development. You will receive payment for participation. This study is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

GABA and the Brain in Autism (GABA)

Medical Condition/Therapy: Autism spectrum disorders

Status: Enrolling

Contact: Email rablab@uw.edu or call 206-616-2889

Description: Drs. Raphael Bernier and Sara Webb are looking for adults, ages 18–30, with and without a diagnosis of ASD to participate in a new study exploring how adults with and without ASD process sensory information. Participation involves up to 3 visits to the University of Washington, which will include:

  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to look at how the brain is responding to different sensory information
  • Assessment of cognitive and social skills and sensory sensitivities
  • 3D photos of the face and head
  • A blood draw for DNA analysis
  • Questionnaires about background and medical history

Participants will receive payment for participation. This study is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Quillivant XR in Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A Pilot Study (ASD/ADHD Study)

Medical Condition/Therapy: Autism, ADHD

Status: Recruiting/enrolling

Contact: Email Sophie Shonka or call 206-884-7838

Description: Seattle Children's researchers Mark Stein, PhD, and Soo-Jeong Kim, MD, are conducting an IRB-approved research study about autism and ADHD. We are looking for 25 children to join the study. The study will measure the effects of an FDA-approved drug, Quillivant XR, on ADHD symptoms in children who have autism spectrum disorder with attention problems. The study will last for 6 weeks. Your child may be able to join if he or she is between the ages of 5 and 16 and has a clinical diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder and attention problems. The study will provide an ADHD evaluation and an autism evaluation (if necessary).

Children from Families with Language Barriers

Impact of Remote Interpreter Modality on Comprehension, Communication Quality and Length of Stay in the Pediatric ED

Medical Condition/Therapy: Children from families with language barriers

Status: Active, not recruiting

Contact: Email Casey Lion or call 206-884-1049

Description: This study will measure the impact of using telephone vs. video interpretation to improve communication with families that require interpretation in the emergency department (ED). Improving communication is central to improving the safety and effectiveness of care provided to these children. Enrolled families will receive either telephone or video interpretation during their ED visit, then complete a telephone survey the following day. Families who agree will also have their ED visit video recorded. Doctors and nurse practitioners in the ED will fill out an online survey.

Chronic Pain

CHAMP (Changing How We Approach Mechanisms of Pain)

Medical Condition/Therapy: Youth at risk for developing chronic pain

Status: Active, not recruiting

Contact: Email Lindsay Durkin

Description: The focus of the CHAMP study (Changing How We Approach Mechanisms of Pain) is to identify factors that place youth at risk for developing chronic pain. This research project will gather information on the mechanisms of chronic pain, particularly the role of the brain in modulating pain signals. We are studying a combination of factors including results from:

  • A lab-based thermal task that looks at how the brain blocks unpleasant sensations
  • Psychological measures
  • Parental reports of responses to their child’s pain behaviors

Learn more.

Concussion

Seattle Pediatric Concussion Research Collaborative

Medical Condition/Therapy: Concussion, traumatic brain injury

Status: Multiple studies active; some recruiting

Contact: Email Christina Schwien  

Description: The Seattle Pediatric Concussion Research Collaborative conducts studies to find better ways to prevent, diagnose and treat youth concussion. Learn more.

Drowning

Long-Term Outcome of Drowning

Medical Condition/Therapy: Drowning

Status: Active, not recruiting

Contact: Email Linda Quan  

Description: This study includes several evaluations of a cohort of people of all ages who had a drowning event in King, Pierce or Snohomish Counties between 1975 and 1996 and were either hospitalized or died due to the drowning. We will evaluate the long-term outcome of survivors of drowning and their survival curves, neurologic status and medical issues in the years after the drowning event. In addition, we will study the subgroup of drowning victims who had a cardiac arrest and were treated by emergency medical services. We will evaluate the survivors to identify what percent eventually were diagnosed with underlying cardiac causes or had subsequent events that might identify the size of this problem among drowning victims.

Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

Long-Term Outcome of Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Survivors

Medical Condition/Therapy: Pediatric cardiac arrest

Status: Active, not recruiting

Contact: Email Linda Quan  

Description: This study consists of several evaluations of children less than 18 years of age who had a cardiac arrest outside of the hospital in Seattle and King County and were treated by emergency medical services, hospitalized and discharged alive. This study evaluates the long-term outcomes of these children in order to identify needs for improved outcomes and to better counsel families as to expectations and needs of this group of survivors. Long-term survival was determined by linking survivors to the state death certificate registry and the National Death Index. Long-term neurologic condition was determined by calculating patients’ cerebral performance scores from chart reviews of the initial and each subsequent hospital discharge. Long-term resource utilization was determined by identifying subsequent hospitalizations, diagnoses, hospital procedures and charges from reviewing hospital records and linkage to the Washington State Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Family Communication and Support in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

Medical Condition/Therapy: Reducing post-traumatic stress disorder

Status: Currently recruiting/enrolling

Contact: Email Dr. Ross Hays, principal investigator, or Erica Bourget, project manager

Description: This project is evaluating the effect of a standardized communication intervention in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) on long-term distress of family members of children in the PICU for 5 days or longer. The study hypothesis is that intervention families will have lower (better) acute stress disorder scores when their child is discharged from the PICU and lower (better) post-traumatic stress disorder scores at 3-month follow-up, as compared to the control group families.

Sleep

Adolescent Insomnia Questionnaire Validation Study

Medical Condition/Therapy: Insomnia

Status: Recruiting/enrolling

Contact: Email Dr. Maggie Bromberg

Description: This purpose of this study is to create and test a new questionnaire to screen for symptoms of insomnia in adolescents 12-18 years of age.

CRAFT Circadian Regulation Study (CRAFT)

Medical Condition/Therapy: ADHD, FASD, typically developing, sleep

Status: Recruiting/enrolling

Contact: Email the CRAFT Study or call 206-884-1195

Description: You're invited to participate in a Seattle Children’s research study about childhood sleep. Researchers at Seattle Children's want to learn more about sleep and child development. This study might be a good fit if your child is 5–8 years old and has sleep problems like resisting bedtime, waking up during the night, not getting enough sleep, feeling tired during the day or having a hard time falling asleep. We’d like to enroll kids both with and without ADHD or prenatal alcohol exposure.

The CRAFT Study will last 2–3 months. If you choose to participate, you will work with a member of the study team during two home visits and several phone calls to problem-solve ways to improve your child’s sleep. Before and after you receive sleep help, you would be asked to complete a survey and a diary of your child’s activities, and your child would be asked to wear sensors on their wrist for 7 days. In addition, members of the study team will come to your home to complete some measurements. They will create a dim-light environment in one room, where they will play quiet games and collect samples of your child’s saliva. This visit will last about 8 hours. As a thank-you for your time, you will receive a free personalized child sleep assessment and may receive up to $90 dollars in gift cards.

The principal investigator of this study is Dr. Michelle Garrison with the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at Seattle Children’s Research Institute.

Sleep Health in Preschoolers (SHIP) Study

Medical Condition/Therapy: Sleep

Status: Recruiting/enrolling

Contact: Email the SHIP Study or call 206-987-SHIP (206-987-7447)

Description: You're invited to participate in a Seattle Children’s research study about childhood sleep. Researchers at Seattle Children's want to learn more about the healthy development of children with sleep problems and find ways to help their families. To see if your family is eligible, visit SHIPStudy.org and complete the online survey. You may also call a member of the study team at 206-987-SHIP (206-987-7447) for more information.

The principal investigator of this study is Dr. Michelle Garrison with the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at Seattle Children’s Research Institute.

Weight Management

BASIC fMRI: Brain Activation and Satiety in Children Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Medical Condition/Therapy: Weight management

Status: Currently enrolling

Contact: Email Maya Rowland, or call at 206-884-8267

Description: The Brain Activation and Satiety in Children Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (BASIC fMRI) study is funded by the National Institutes of Health. The goal of this study is to look at brain responses to food and family-based behavioral treatment in order to find better ways to help families maintain a healthy weight. Participating families will enroll in a free family-based behavioral weight management treatment sessions for six months. Enrolled children will also have study visits for assessments which will include fMRI scans, blood draws, surveys, and body measurements. Learn more.

SHIFT: Success in Health: Impacting Families Together

Researchers at Seattle Children’s want to find ways to help parents and their kids better manage their weight. The Success in Health: Impacting Families Together (SHIFT) study is for kids 7-11 years old and their parents.

Medical Condition/Therapy: Weight management

Status: Currently Enrolling

Contact: Learn more at www.SHIFTStudy.org and take a short survey to see if you are eligible for our study or contact Diana Prise at 206-884-2210 or diana.prise@seattlechildrens.org

Description: The SHIFT study might be a good fit for you if:

  • Your child is 7 to 11 years old and is heavy for his or her age and gender.
  • At least one of your child’s parents is overweight.
  • You and your child speak English.
  • Both you and your child are not currently in any treatment that affects weight or growth.

If you and your child decide to take part in the study, both you and your child would:

  • Participate in family-based behavioral weight control treatment sessions every week for five months.
  • The sessions are free and run in the evening for about 90 minutes at our clinics in:
    • Bellevue
    • Downtown Seattle
    • Everett
    • Federal Way
  • Get measurements of weight, height, and waist before receiving any treatment.
  • Get measurements taken throughout and after treatment (like the ones done before treatment).
  • Complete some surveys and interviews
  • Some treated parents may be invited to work with the next group of families to help them implement the skills they learned to be successful in weight management.

Families who complete all assessments will get up to $125.00 in gift cards to thank them for their time.

Many children and parents have better weight control from receiving behavioral treatment. This study does not use medicines or medical procedures.