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Avery H. Weiss, MD

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Avery H. Weiss, MD

Ophthalmology, Craniofacial, Mitochondrial Medicine, Vascular Anomalies

On staff since October 1991

Children's Title: Division Chief, Ophthalmology; Program Director, Ophthalmology Education

Academic Title: Professor

Research Center: Center for Integrative Brain Research

Recommendations

DawnKuna09.10.14
I was referred to Dr. Weiss through a friend of mine who is a nurse.. My son Dominic is nearly 4.5 months old...When he was between 8 and 10 weeks old, I discovered an abnormality in his left eye.. I brought it to the attention of his pediatrician who then referred me to a local ophthalmic specialist.. He diagnosed Dominic with Persistent Fetal Vasculature, and Optic Nerve Hypoplasia.. I went with my gut instincts and decided to schedule an appointment with Dr. Weiss.. I could not have made a better decision...My husband, Dominic and I made the 10+ hour drive from Boise Idaho to see Dr. Weiss.. Within the first five minutes of our consultation, Dr. Weiss had an idea of what was going on with Dominic.. His staff worked at top speed, and did a wonderful job articulating to my husband and I everything that was happening.. They took into consideration that we had traveled quite some time, and got us onto the schedule for the next day.. Dr. Weiss told us that he believed our son had a rare condition, Optic Nerve Aplasia.. He then went on to explain that in his 40 years in ophthalmology that he had only seen this condition one other time, but that he would always remember his patient.. He informed us that unfortunately there was not much information about this condition, and said that he wanted to do a couple of procedures to be able to answer all of our questions.. Because of Dominic's Persistent Fetal Vasculature, there was no way to tell whether the ONA affected both eyes or not.. Dr. Weiss then proceeded to explain the procedures that he wished to have done for Dominic, and he explained them in great detail.. He explained to us that while these were not entirely necessary, they would give us the answers that we needed, and that it could all be done without any surgery of any kind.. He also explained that not only would this help us in our understanding of Dominic's conditions, but that it could also later on help anyone who has a child or children born with the same condition.. There was never a doubt in my mind that we had made the right decision by traveling to meet Dr. Weiss.. I can not begin to express how grateful we are for Dr. Weiss and his team at Seattle Children's hospital.. I will recommend him to anyone who is willing to listen.. Had we not gone to Dr. Weiss, we would still be either in the dark, or misinformed of Dominic's condition.. If this does not help you in deciding whether to see him or not, I don't know what else will.. Dr. Weiss, my family and I thank you greatly for all you have done for us..
KatherineLynnwood, WA01.21.14
Dr. Weiss has truly been an answer to prayer for us. We started with a different physician for our daughter prior to being referred to Dr. Weiss. When we first came to see him, we were so scared and confused, but he was able to give us answers we had been searching for and a do-able treatment plan right away! He is a brilliant man, and God has truly gifted him. However, what we appreciate the most is his conservative approach to surgery. He would not put our daughter through any surgery until it was absolutely necessary. When he finally did suggest surgery for her, I knew I could fully trust him. He did a remarkable job in surgery!
SusanRedmond, WA03.06.12
Dr. Weiss is a treasure of wisdom and experience, and knowledge. He is friendly, very very knowledgable and has fun with kids. He is very supportive and insightful for parents with children who have visual disorders, and understands developmental implications, distinguishes between necessary and unnecessary support. He is a wonderful wonderful doctor.
SarahIssaquah, WA09.13.11
Dr. Weiss was extremely thorough upon our son's first comprehensive eye examination. He quickly identified vision problems but also noticed a structural anomaly that he was able to link to a syndrome that we have been trying to pinpoint for sometime. His work may very well be the missing link to the long standing and puzzling questions that we as parents and his other care team have had. He let us listen to his dictation of clinic notes to our pediatrician and he was detailed in his communications. Though I was tired from a long day at the hospital (we had other clinic visits that day) he came in cheery and ready to examine our son. He was a pleasure to work with.
LisaLacey,WA05.11.11
We love Dr. Weiss. He listens very carefully and our clinic notes are the most accurate we get from any physician. He is also very balanced and does not make you feel foolish for what may be silly parent questions, yet will give great, complicated, thorough answers if you like those. Love him.
Recommend Dr. Avery Weiss

Overview

Board Certification(s)
Ophthalmology
Medical/Professional School
University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami
Residency
Internal Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis
Ophthalmology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis
Fellowship
Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis
Clinical Interests

Electroretinogram, Oculomotor testing (Eye Movement Testing), Visual evoked potential

Research Description

We study visual function in a wide range of clinical disorders using visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Presently, we are concentrating on visual impairments associated with cortical malformations and visual pathway tumors. We are also interested in how the visual system extracts information from a moving a moving stimulus in patients with infantile nystagmus.

Research Focus Area

Translational Research

Awards and Honors

Award NameAward DescriptionAwarded ByAward Date
Seattle Magazine Top Doctor - 2013Seattle Magazine 2013
U.S. News Top DoctorU.S. News and World Report 2012
"Guide to America's Top Pediatricians"Consumer's Research Council of America 2009

Publications

Ocular Abnormalities in Childhood Metabolic Disorders
Harley's Pediatirc Ophthalmology-Sixth Edition , 2014
Persistent figure-eight and side-to-side head shaking is a marker for rhombencephalosynapsis.
Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society , 2013 Dec: 28(14)2019-23
Esotropia greater at distance: children vs adults.
JAMA ophthalmology , 2013 Mar: 131(3)370-5
Optic Neuritis-Acute Visual Loss & Visual Inattention-An Infant Who Seems not to See
Challenging Cases in Pediatric Ophthalmology , 2013
Reduced L- and M- and increased S-cone functions in an infant with thyroid hormone resistance due to mutations in the THR2 gene.
Ophthalmic genetics , 2012 Dec: 33(4)187-95
Congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction: delineation of anatomic abnormalities with 3-dimensional reconstruction.
Archives of ophthalmology , 2012 Jul 1: 130(7)842-8
Longitudinal measures of visual function, tumor volume, and prediction of visual outcomes after treatment of optic pathway gliomas.
Ophthalmology , 2012 Jun: 119(6)1231-7
Extraction of a Check-Reversal Visual Evoked Potential under Conditions of Simulated Nystagmus
The Challenge of Nystagmus , 2012: 367-382
Relationship of slow-phase velocity to visual acuity in infantile nystagmus associated with albinism.
Journal of AAPOS : the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus / American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus , 2011 Feb: 15(1)33-9
Developmental anatomy of the nasolacrimal duct: implications for congenital obstruction.
Ophthalmology , 2010 Dec: 117(12)2430-4
Autofluorescence and infrared retinal imaging in patients and obligate carriers with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.
Ophthalmic genetics , 2009 Dec: 190-8
Autofluorescence and infrared retinal imaging in patients and obligate carriers with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.
Ophthalmic genetics , 2009 Dec: 30(4)190-8
Eye movement abnormalities in Joubert syndrome.
Investigative ophthalmology & visual science , 2009 Oct: 4669-77
Eye movement abnormalities in Joubert syndrome.
Investigative ophthalmology & visual science , 2009 Oct: 50(10)4669-77
Retinal function and corresponding pathology in advanced retinoblastoma.
Archives of ophthalmology , 2008 Nov: 1507-12
Retinal function and corresponding pathology in advanced retinoblastoma.
Archives of ophthalmology , 2008 Nov: 126(11)1507-12
Hypermetropia and esotropia in myotonic dystrophy.
Journal of AAPOS : the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus / American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus , 2008 Feb: 69-71
Reappraisal of astigmatism induced by periocular capillary hemangioma and treatment with intralesional corticosteroid injection.
Ophthalmology , 2008 Feb: 390-397.e1
Uveitis and Chorioretinitis
Priniples and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Disease , 2008: 504-508
Hypermetropia and esotropia in myotonic dystrophy.
Journal of AAPOS : the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus / American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus , 2008 Feb: 12(1)69-71
Infective Keratitis
Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases , 2008: 500-503
Reappraisal of astigmatism induced by periocular capillary hemangioma and treatment with intralesional corticosteroid injection.
Ophthalmology , 2008 Feb: 115(2)390-397.e1
Conjunctivitis Beyond the Neonatal Period
Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases , 2008: 495-500
Conjunctivitis in the Neonatal Period (Ophthalmia Neonatorum)
, 2008: 492-495
Acuity development in infantile nystagmus.
Investigative ophthalmology & visual science , 2007 Sep: 4093-9
Acuity development in infantile nystagmus.
Investigative ophthalmology & visual science , 2007 Sep: 48(9)4093-9
Comparison of pattern visual-evoked potentials to perimetry in the detection of visual loss in children with optic pathway gliomas.
Journal of AAPOS : the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus / American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus , 2006 Aug: 298-306
Hypertropia associated with superolateral translation of the superior rectus muscle pulley in unilateral coronal synostosis.
Archives of ophthalmology , 2006 Aug: 1128-34
Hypertropia associated with superolateral translation of the superior rectus muscle pulley in unilateral coronal synostosis.
Archives of ophthalmology , 2006 Aug: 124(8)1128-34
Comparison of pattern visual-evoked potentials to perimetry in the detection of visual loss in children with optic pathway gliomas.
Journal of AAPOS : the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus / American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus , 2006 Aug: 10(4)298-306
Congenital and compensated vestibular dysfunction in childhood: an overlooked entity.
Journal of child neurology , 2006 Jul: 572-9
Congenital and compensated vestibular dysfunction in childhood: an overlooked entity.
Journal of child neurology , 2006 Jul: 21(7)572-9
Topographical retinal function in oculocutaneous albinism.
American journal of ophthalmology , 2006 Jun: 1156-8
Topographical retinal function in oculocutaneous albinism.
American journal of ophthalmology , 2006 Jun: 141(6)1156-8
Spatial-frequency-dependent changes in cortical activation before and after patching in amblyopic children.
Investigative ophthalmology & visual science , 2004 Oct: 3531-7
Spatial-frequency-dependent changes in cortical activation before and after patching in amblyopic children.
Investigative ophthalmology & visual science , 2004 Oct: 45(10)3531-7
Ophthalmoplegic migraine.
Pediatric neurology , 2004 Jan: 64-6
Ophthalmoplegic migraine.
Pediatric neurology , 2004 Jan: 30(1)64-6
ERGs, cone-isolating VEPs and analytical techniques in children with cone dysfunction syndromes.
Documenta ophthalmologica. Advances in ophthalmology , 2003 May: 289-304
ERGs, cone-isolating VEPs and analytical techniques in children with cone dysfunction syndromes.
Documenta ophthalmologica. Advances in ophthalmology , 2003 May: 106(3)289-304
Acuity, ophthalmoscopy, and visually evoked potentials in the prediction of visual outcome in infants with bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia.
Journal of AAPOS : the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus / American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus , 2003 Apr: 108-15
Acuity, ophthalmoscopy, and visually evoked potentials in the prediction of visual outcome in infants with bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia.
Journal of AAPOS : the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus / American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus , 2003 Apr: 7(2)108-15
Imaging a child's fundus without dilation using a handheld confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope.
Archives of ophthalmology , 2003 Mar: 391-6
Imaging a child's fundus without dilation using a handheld confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope.
Archives of ophthalmology , 2003 Mar: 121(3)391-6
Shotgun identification of protein modifications from protein complexes and lens tissue.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America , 2002 Jun 11: 99(12)7900-5
Does soccer ball heading cause retinal bleeding?
Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine , 2002 Apr: 337-40
Does soccer ball heading cause retinal bleeding?
Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine , 2002 Apr: 156(4)337-40
Trapdoor fracture of the orbit in a pediatric population.
Plastic and reconstructive surgery , 2002 Feb: 482-9; discussion 490-5
Trapdoor fracture of the orbit in a pediatric population.
Plastic and reconstructive surgery , 2002 Feb: 109(2)482-9; discussion 490-5
Grand rounds #67. A case of a right sixth nerve paralysis and a left third nerve paralysis.
Binocular vision & strabismus quarterly , 2002: 216-22
Grand rounds #67. A case of a right sixth nerve paralysis and a left third nerve paralysis.
Binocular vision & strabismus quarterly , 2002: 17(3)216-22
Anophthalmia/Microphthalmia Overview
, 1993

Research Funding

Grant TitleGrantorAmountAward Date
Ophthalomology ResearchPeter G. La Haye Endowment

Primary Office

Seattle Children's
OA.9.220 - Ophthalmology
4800 Sand Point Way NE
Seattle, WA 98105
206-987-2177

Additional Offices

Harborview Medical Center
HMC Box 359608 - Eye Institute
325 - 9th Ave
Seattle, WA 98104
206-744-3937

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