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Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center Establishes Endowed Chair for the Odessa Brown Children's Clinic

September 28, 2005

Jim and Janet Sinegal have donated $1.5 million to Children’s to establish an endowed chair for the Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic, a program of Children’s. Ben Danielson, MD, Medical Director at the Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic, Seattle, has been selected as the first holder of the chair.

Jim and Janet Sinegal have donated $1.5 million to Children’s to establish an endowed chair for the Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic, a program of Children’s. Ben Danielson, MD, Medical Director at the Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic, Seattle, has been selected as the first holder of the chair.

Funding for this Endowed Chair will be used to support Danielson’s work as an advocate for health care for underserved populations and in increasing diversity within the medical profession.

“Dr. Danielson was honored with this appointment for his unwavering dedication to the children at risk for being underserved in the community. He has been a champion for diversity in healthcare and has been a treasured role model for those populations under represented in healthcare,” says Richard A. Molteni, MD, medical director at Children’s. His contributions include the development of a comprehensive primary care program for children that also addresses their dental and mental health needs, improving services to children in foster and kindred care, and providing school-based youth healthcare.

A graduate of Harvard University, Danielson completed his medical degree at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and his pediatric residency at Children’s. In addition to serving as medical director of Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic, he is the medical director in a school-based clinic at Cleveland High School. In 2004, he was awarded the Charlie Garcia Distinguished Service Award, named after the former assistant dean for multicultural affairs at the University of Washington School of Medicine who retired in 2003. The award recognized his efforts to increase diversity within the medical profession, and currently, he is working to help increase diversity within the Pediatric Residency Program at the University of Washington School of Medicine. He participates in the African American Mentor Network, and has served as a mentor for students in the Summer Medical Education Program, a six-week enrichment program for under-represented college students interested in medicine and dentistry.

Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic opened in 1970 and is located in Seattle’s central district. Staff provides pediatric primary and dental care, and mental health services for children to 21 years of age. Focused services include chronic disease management for children with asthma and sickle cell disease.

About Seattle Children’s

Consistently ranked as one of the best children’s hospitals in the country by U.S. News & World Report, Seattle Children’s serves as the pediatric and adolescent academic medical referral center for the largest landmass of any children’s hospital in the country (Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho). For more than 100 years, Seattle Children’s has been delivering superior patient care while advancing new treatments through pediatric research. Seattle Children’s serves as the primary teaching, clinical and research site for the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. The hospital works in partnership with Seattle Children’s Research Institute and Seattle Children’s Hospital Foundation. For more information, visit www.seattlechildrens.org or follow us on Twitter or Facebook.

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