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Video Urges New Parents to ''Have A Plan'' for Coping with Parenting Stress

April 20, 2004

Seattle, WA: – As part of its Child Abuse Prevention Month activities during April, the Children's Protection Program at Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center, along with its partners, the Washington Council for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (WCPCAN), the Conscious Fathering Program, and the Washington Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), has created a public service video to help new parents cope with the stress of a crying infant.

Seattle, WA: – As part of its Child Abuse Prevention Month activities during April, the Children's Protection Program at Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center, along with its partners, the Washington Council for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (WCPCAN), the Conscious Fathering Program, and the Washington Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), has created a public service video to help new parents cope with the stress of a crying infant.

Video Helps Parents to "Have a Plan"

It is common for parents of newborns to experience fatigue, stress, tension, frustration, anxiety, and conflict as part of parenting. Through the unscripted insights and comments from a real-life couple with a newborn baby, the five-minute video, titled "Have A Plan," urges parents to plan ahead and be prepared to manage these emotions so that when they occur, they are able to keep their children safe. The video also provides a checklist of resources from child health advocates intended to reduce a parent's stress level during peak crying times.

"Many families who come to Children's Hospital with a sick or injured child experience stress or other feelings of things being out of control," said Carol Jenkins, manager of Children's Protection Program at Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center.

"This video may be helpful not only for them, but new parents across Washington who struggle with these same emotions. By having a plan about how they will react to their newborn's inevitable crying, parents can help make sure their children grow up in a safe and nurturing environment – which every child deserves."

Ordering Information

Copies of the "Have A Plan" video are available to parents, caregivers, birthing hospitals, childbirth education classes, and others throughout Washington state for $18 (available in VHS/DVD formats) and can be ordered by e-mailing haveaplan@seattlechildrens.org.

About Seattle Children’s

Consistently ranked as one of the best children’s hospitals in the country by U.S. News & World Report, Seattle Children’s serves as the pediatric and adolescent academic medical referral center for the largest landmass of any children’s hospital in the country (Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho). For more than 100 years, Seattle Children’s has been delivering superior patient care while advancing new treatments through pediatric research. Seattle Children’s serves as the primary teaching, clinical and research site for the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. The hospital works in partnership with Seattle Children’s Research Institute and Seattle Children’s Hospital Foundation. For more information, visit www.seattlechildrens.org or follow us on Twitter or Facebook.

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