Leading British Medical Journal Publishes Article by Children's Physicians

Physicians from Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center in Seattle were recently invited to submit a Seminar article about nephrotic syndrome in children for The Lancet, a leading international medical journal based in London.


Physicians from Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center in Seattle were recently invited to submit a Seminar article about nephrotic syndrome in children for The Lancet, a leading international medical journal based in London.

Seattle, Wash.: September 17, 2003 – Physicians from Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center in Seattle were recently invited to submit a Seminar article about nephrotic syndrome in children for The Lancet, a leading international medical journal based in London.

The Seminar paper, written by Allison Eddy, MD, division head of nephrology at Children’s, and Jordan Symons, MD, attending nephrologist at Children’s, was published in the August 23, 2003 issue of The Lancet. Dr. Eddy and Dr. Symons examined every English-language paper on nephrotic syndrome published between 1996 – 2002 and focused on the recent advances in the cause, treatment and long-term complications of the disease. The Lancet Seminars are disease-oriented, clinically focused overviews for the generalist that cover the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of a topic.

“Faculty at the Children’s Hospital are improving the care of children throughout the world,” said Dr. Bruder Stapleton, pediatrician-in-chief at Children’s. “We are fortunate to have such talented clinical and research physicians such as Drs. Eddy and Symons at our institution.”

Nephrotic syndrome is usually a chronic relapsing kidney disease that is fairly common in childhood, affecting sixteen out of every 100,000 children. The disease causes changes in the body chemistry and fluid retention, leading to swelling as a result of excessive loss of protein in the urine. While the primary cause of this disease that affects the blood-filtering units (glomeruli) in the kidney is still not fully understood, it is thought to be a disorder of the immune system. Children are usually treated with immunosuppressant drugs to control and reverse the disease. Some forms of nephrotic syndrome are resistant to all therapy and these children eventually need treatment with dialysis and a kidney transplant. Some major advances in the last five years in the identification of new genes that may be responsible for nephrotic syndrome will hopefully lead to new and better therapies in the future.

“From a clinical perspective, we follow a significant number of children with nephrotic syndrome, so we see firsthand the devastating effect it can have on our patients and families,” said Dr. Eddy, author of numerous book chapters on nephrotic syndrome and a specialist in abnormalities of the kidney. “This Seminar article in The Lancet should further the understanding of a complex disease, and is a recognition of Children’s nephrology program as a leader in the field.”

Media Contact:
Jennifer Seymour, Media Relations Manager
Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center
(206) 987.5207
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