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Shaken Baby Syndrome Featured Topic at Children's Conference

April 04, 2003

Olympia - A keynote presentation and panel discussion on Shaken Baby Syndrome will be featured at the 11th Annual Children's Justice Conference scheduled for April 6, 7 and 8 at the Meydenbauer Center in Bellevue.

Conference Dedicated In Memory Of Child Welfare Leader Rosie Oreskovich

Olympia - A keynote presentation and panel discussion on Shaken Baby Syndrome will be featured at the 11th Annual Children's Justice Conference scheduled for April 6, 7 and 8 at the Meydenbauer Center in Bellevue.

The annual conference - one of the largest in the United States related to child maltreatment issues - is sponsored by the state Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) in tandem with other private and government groups.

This year's conference will be dedicated in honor of Rosalyn "Rosie" Oreskovich, a state leader on child welfare issues, who died Feb. 28, in Seattle. Oreskovich served as the assistant secretary of the DSHS Children's Administration since 1994.

Dr. Carole Jenny, professor of pediatrics at Brown University School of Medicine, Providence, RI, will present the workshop, "Shaken Baby Syndrome: The Past, the Present, and the Future," from 9:30 to noon, Tuesday, April 8.

She directs the Child Protection Program at Hasbro Children's Hospital in Providence. She is past chair of the Section on Child Abuse and Neglect of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and currently is a member AAP's Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect. Before moving to Rhode Island, Dr. Jenny, was a faculty member at the University of Washington and the University of Colorado.

Conference also focused on street youth and cultural issues

This year's conference will also highlight street youth as well as diversity and cultural issues when dealing with child abuse and neglect.

A pre-conference seminar on Sunday April 6, at the Meydenbauer Center beginning at 9:00 a.m., will focus on youth who live on the streets. Tatiana Balachova, Ph.D., Center for Child Abuse and Neglect, University of Oklahoma, and Sheldon Levy, Ph.D, Brown University Medical School will present the film, Children Underground. It presents eye-opening, true stories of street children worldwide. The film received the Special Jury Prize at the 2001 Sundance Film Festival.

Balachova and Levy also will lead a panel presentation beginning at 1:00 p.m., on understanding the causes and effects of children living on the streets and possible community responses to the problem.

They will discuss comparisons between children in the United States, Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Prevention and intervention approaches also will be presented. At 2:00 p.m. there will be a panel discussion, "Bringing It Home to Washington," by facilitators Pat O'Brien and Lori McDonald.

Diversity and cultural issues also will be addressed in several workshops including, Youth Identity: The Race Factor; The Color of White; Ethnopsychopharmacology (discussing the effects that psychotropic medications have on different cultural groups); Building Authentic, Healthy Communities for Indian Children; Towards Culturally Competent Assessments; Beyond the Melting Pot: Addressing the Designs of Omission; Affirming Diversity in the 21st Century; and Developing Comprehensive Child Abuse Programs in Indian Country.

Other keynote presentations

Monday's keynote speaker Dr. Mary Frances Berry will talk on racism in America, offering analysis and insights into what is and what is not working in American race relations. Berry is the Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought at the University of Pennsylvania, where she teaches history and law.

On Tuesday, keynote speaker Lucy Berliner, MSW, will discuss intervention methods for abused and neglected children and their families. Berliner is director of Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress and clinical associate professor, University of Washington School of Social Work and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

Featured guests include Leonard Pitts Jr. and Terry Thomas.

Pitts is a syndicated columnist and author of Becoming Dad, Black Men and the Journey to Fatherhood. He also produced Who We Are, an award-winning radio documentary on the history of Black America.

Special agent Thomas is with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. He is the statewide coordinator of the Crimes Against Children Program and helped develop Florida's Rapid Response Team that investigates multiple victim child abuse cases.

Again this year, experts will provide participants with important information on protecting children from child molesters. Other workshops will discuss rape investigations, interviewing child molesters, shaken baby syndrome, the community's role in protecting children from maltreatment and finding permanent homes for teens.

About Seattle Children’s

Consistently ranked as one of the best children’s hospitals in the country by U.S. News & World Report, Seattle Children’s serves as the pediatric and adolescent academic medical referral center for the largest landmass of any children’s hospital in the country (Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho). For more than 100 years, Seattle Children’s has been delivering superior patient care while advancing new treatments through pediatric research. Seattle Children’s serves as the primary teaching, clinical and research site for the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. The hospital works in partnership with Seattle Children’s Research Institute and Seattle Children’s Hospital Foundation. For more information, visit www.seattlechildrens.org or follow us on Twitter or Facebook.

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