Skip to main content

Search
For Media

Press Releases

|

Children's Physician Receives National Award - Nigel Bamford, M.D.

December 10, 2002

Seattle: Nigel Bamford, M.D., was recently recognized as the 2002 national recipient of the Child Neurology Society’s Young Investigator Award, honoring him as one of the most accomplished young scientists in pediatric neurology. The Child Neurology Society bestows the prestigious award on promising young investigators involved in basic or clinical research. Applications are judged on the basis of originality, scientific merit and relevance to the field.

Seattle: Nigel Bamford, M.D., was recently recognized as the 2002 national recipient of the Child Neurology Society’s Young Investigator Award, honoring him as one of the most accomplished young scientists in pediatric neurology. The Child Neurology Society bestows the prestigious award on promising young investigators involved in basic or clinical research. Applications are judged on the basis of originality, scientific merit and relevance to the field.

In recognition, Dr. Bamford received a grant-in-aid award and presented his work during the Child Neurology Society’s 31st Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. In addition to his role as an attending physician in Children’s department of neurology, Dr. Bamford is also an assistant professor of neurology and adjunct assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

The Child Neurology Society honored Dr. Bamford for his work on understanding how dopamine affects the transmission of chemical signals within the brain. This knowledge will contribute to understanding pediatric movement disorders, as well as how drug abuse by pregnant women may affect the developing brain of their offspring.

“Dr. Bamford has developed some exciting and elegant techniques for the study of motor systems within the developing brain,” said Sidney Gospe, M.D., Ph.D, division head of neurology at Children’s. “His recruitment puts into place the first major building block for the development of our pediatric neuroscience research programs. We are confident that Dr. Bamford’s research excellence and clinical expertise positions Children’s for future growth and success in this area.”

“The Pediatric Neurology Laboratory at the University of Washington’s Center on Human Development and Disability are committed to the research of early motor development in children,” said Dr. Bamford. “By examining the functional properties of neural pathways involved in motor control, the laboratory also seeks to provide an understanding of the pathophysiology underlying pediatric motor disabilities and movement disorders. We are also seeking insights into the mechanisms underlying degenerative conditions such as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease as well as those involved in drug addition and reward.”

Dr. Bamford comes to Children’s from Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, where he served as an assistant attending neurologist. He received his medical degree from the University of Utah Medical School and completed his pediatric residency at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center and his pediatric neurology residency at the Neurological Institute of New York, NY. He is board certified in pediatrics and neurology. In addition to providing clinical support, Dr. Bamford will be investigating development of subcortical neuropathways and their role in motor function.

About Seattle Children’s

Consistently ranked as one of the best children’s hospitals in the country by U.S. News & World Report, Seattle Children’s serves as the pediatric and adolescent academic medical referral center for the largest landmass of any children’s hospital in the country (Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho). For more than 100 years, Seattle Children’s has been delivering superior patient care while advancing new treatments through pediatric research. Seattle Children’s serves as the primary teaching, clinical and research site for the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. The hospital works in partnership with Seattle Children’s Research Institute and Seattle Children’s Hospital Foundation. For more information, visit www.seattlechildrens.org or follow us on Twitter or Facebook.

Latest News

Vaccine Safety: Getting the Message to Parents in Doubt
8.28.14 — U.S. News & World Report

Measles, mumps and whooping cough have been around a long time – along with the vaccines to prevent them. But instead of being ... cont.

Depressed Teens May Need Extra Support To Stick With Treatment
8.27.14 — NPR

A new study from Seattle Children’s Research Institute suggests integrating mental health treatment into primary care may ... cont.

Can running cure depression? Seattle Children’s brain research finds exercise can help patients
8.26.14 — Puget Sound Business Journal

Researchers at Seattle Children’s Research Institute have pinpointed a tiny area of the brain that controls our motivation to ... cont.