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Research Grants May Lead to New Therapies for Treating Childhood Asthma

August 05, 2002

Seattle - Exercise-induced asthma, genetic immunology and ibuprofen are the subjects of research projects for which grant awards were announced today by the American Lung Association of Washington.

Seattle - Exercise-induced asthma, genetic immunology and ibuprofen are the subjects of research projects for which grant awards were announced today by the American Lung Association of Washington. The grant awards will go to fund the work of five pulmonary physicians in Seattle.

Jason Debley, MD, at Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Teal Hallstrand, MD, and David Park, MD, at Harborview Medical Center, and Jason Chien, MD, at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, received individual research grants.

In some adults with asthma, taking aspirin or ibuprofen can trigger an asthma attack. Aspirin and ibuprofen, as well as other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, share a similar mechanism that can cause the release of biochemicals which act as powerful triggers of airways spasm in asthma attacks.

“What we don’t know is whether, like in adults, medications such as ibuprofen can worsen asthma severity in some children,” Debley, MD, said.

Debley said his study could lead to changes in national guidelines regarding use of ibuprofen in children with asthma.

The Lung Association has funded peer-reviewed research projects for physicians and other local health care professionals for over 80 years. Research started with tuberculosis many years ago and continues today with projects like those of Drs. Debley, Hallstrand, Park and Chien.

Lung Association grants are unique and valuable in that they help support emerging researchers, many of whom go on to make important discoveries and advances in treatment.

About American Lung Association of Washington

Founded in 1906, the American Lung Association of Washington’s mission is to assure lung health for the people of Washington. For more information about the Lung Association’s research program and its community health programs in tobacco control, asthma, and air quality, please call 1-800-732-9339 (Washington only) or visit our website at www.alaw.org.

About Seattle Children’s

Consistently ranked as one of the best children’s hospitals in the country by U.S. News & World Report, Seattle Children’s serves as the pediatric and adolescent academic medical referral center for the largest landmass of any children’s hospital in the country (Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho). For more than 100 years, Seattle Children’s has been delivering superior patient care while advancing new treatments through pediatric research. Seattle Children’s serves as the primary teaching, clinical and research site for the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. The hospital works in partnership with Seattle Children’s Research Institute and Seattle Children’s Hospital Foundation. For more information, visit www.seattlechildrens.org or follow us on Twitter or Facebook.

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