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Stacy Keach to Visit Craniofacial Center at Children's Hospital

May 01, 2002

Stacy Keach was born with a cleft lip and partial cleft of the hard palate on June 2, 1941, and became an accomplished actor, winning a Golden Globe for “Best Actor,” three Obie Awards, and the Millennium Recognition Award for outstanding contribution to classical theatre.

WHAT: Actor Stacy Keach will meet with Craniofacial Center patients and their families to speak about his personal experience of being born with a cleft lip and palate, and urge parents to build self-esteem in their children, regardless of their differences. Michael Cunningham, MD, PhD, director of the Craniofacial Center, will be on hand to discuss the challenges facing children born with craniofacial abnormalities, the latest medical advancements in treating these conditions, and the services available at the Craniofacial Center.

WHEN: Saturday, May 4, 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

WHERE: Children’s Hospital & Regional Medical Center
4800 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle
Meet at Train Entrance

Stacy Keach was born with a cleft lip and partial cleft of the hard palate on June 2, 1941, and became an accomplished actor, winning a Golden Globe for “Best Actor,” three Obie Awards, and the Millennium Recognition Award for outstanding contribution to classical theatre. While his parents could pay for the surgeries required to treat these conditions, Mr. Keach hopes to raise awareness about the number of children affected by cleft lip or palate each year whose families cannot afford treatment. Mr. Keach is active in the cleft palate community and has served as the Honorary Chair of the Cleft Palate Foundation since 1994, and as spokesperson for the World Craniofacial Foundation.

Children’s Craniofacial Center offers complete diagnosis and long-term management for children born with craniofacial abnormalities. This includes children born with cleft lip and palate, craniosynostosis and other complex craniofacial conditions. The Craniofacial Center’s 40-member multidisciplinary team has provided comprehensive continuity of care for this patient population since the program was established in 1980.

About Seattle Children’s

Consistently ranked as one of the best children’s hospitals in the country by U.S. News & World Report, Seattle Children’s serves as the pediatric and adolescent academic medical referral center for the largest landmass of any children’s hospital in the country (Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho). For more than 100 years, Seattle Children’s has been delivering superior patient care while advancing new treatments through pediatric research. Seattle Children’s serves as the primary teaching, clinical and research site for the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. The hospital works in partnership with Seattle Children’s Research Institute and Seattle Children’s Hospital Foundation. For more information, visit www.seattlechildrens.org or follow us on Twitter or Facebook.

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