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Teen Depression and Anxiety: Why the Kids Are Not Alright

Teen Depression and Anxiety: Why the Kids Are Not Alright

“We’re the first generation that cannot escape our problems at all,” says Faith-Ann, a teen dealing with depression and anxiety. “We’re getting this constant pressure, from our phones, from our relationships, from the way things are today.” Dr. Megan Moreno, head of social media and adolescent health research at Seattle Children’s, notes a big difference between the mobile-social-tech revolution of the past 15 years; however, she cautions against demonizing technology entirely. “I often tell parents my simplest analogy is it’s like a hammer. You can build a house that’s never existed before and you can smash someone’s head in, and it’s the same tool.” Sometimes phones rob teens’ developing brains of essential downtime. But other times they’re a way to maintain healthy social connections and get support.

About Seattle Children’s

Seattle Children’s mission is to provide hope, care and cures to help every child live the healthiest and most fulfilling life possible. Together, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Research Institute and Foundation deliver superior patient care, identify new discoveries and treatments through pediatric research, and raise funds to create better futures for patients.

Ranked as one of the top children’s hospitals in the country by U.S. News & World Report, Seattle Children’s serves as the pediatric and adolescent academic medical center for Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho – the largest region of any children’s hospital in the country. As one of the nation's top five pediatric research centers, Seattle Children’s Research Institute is internationally recognized for its work in neurosciences, immunology, cancer, infectious disease, injury prevention and much more. Seattle Children’s Hospital and Research Foundation works with the Seattle Children’s Guild Association, the largest all-volunteer fundraising network for any hospital in the country, to gather community support and raise funds for uncompensated care and research.

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