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Phthalates are out of infants’ toys but a heavy dose is still in their food

Phthalates are out of infants’ toys but a heavy dose is still in their food

Source: Washington Post

Remember the great phthalate scare of 2008? Congress, in a rare bipartisan response to a clamor from parents and health experts that children’s toys made abroad were laced with chemicals that could harm boys’ reproductive systems, banned the toxins so infants would no longer ingest them by mouthing the plastic objects. And then phthalates (pronounced thal-eights) pretty much faded from public view. But a new study shows that an infant with a typical diet is still consuming twice as much of the chemicals as the Environmental Protection Agency considers safe. Meats — poultry in particular — high fat dairy products such as whole milk and cream, cooking oils and fats such as margarine all contain high levels of the chemicals, according to the research, published in June in the journal Environmental Health. As a result, infants and toddlers who consume solid food are still taking in too much of them, said one of the researchers, Dr. Sheela Sathyanarayana, of the University of Washington School of Medicine and Seattle Children’s Research Institute.

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