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Strategic Plan

Safe, Effective Care

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Provide the Safest, Most Effective Care Possible

Safe, Effective Care Pinwheel

Eliminate medical errors by focusing on systems, people and technology.

Systems

  • Accelerate the implementation of Clinical Standard Work.
  • Establish systems to prevent and respond rapidly to medical errors and hospital-acquired infections.

People

  • Improve our management systems to support safe practice.
  • Improve medication safety through enhanced oversight and pharmacy staffing.
  • Support a family-centered model of care.

Technology

  • Utilize technology to improve medication safety.
  • Complete the transition to an electronic medical record system.

Measure and report our progress

  • Develop an integrated safety index to track our progress toward eliminating preventable harm.

Our Patients Deserve the Best: Communication Improves Safety

When patients move from one part of Children’s to another, lots of important knowledge about their history, condition and needs must move with them. It is critical that the knowledge is complete and correct – and that parents are confident in the process. That is especially true when the move involves transferring a fragile newborn from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) to acute care rooms.

As part of the hospital’s commitment to Continuous Performance Improvement (CPI), a group representing areas that play key roles in transferring children from the NICU introduced several new steps to improve communication, increase family involvement and enhance transparency during the transition between the NICU and acute care teams. The new steps are designed to ease families’ anxiety and quickly connect them to the new team.

For instance, one of the steps calls for the NICU nurse to complete a nursing report and share it with the parents in the patient’s room or over the phone. Physicians will exchange information in a similar fashion.

“It’s hard when your child lands in the NICU,” says Rick Lundeen, a parent who worked with the group. “I wanted to be absolutely certain that knowledge about my child’s unique situation was transferred – accurately and completely – from one care team to the other. Hearing about an exchange of information is one thing; actually being involved is another.”

Another key step adds a visit from the NICU team to the acute care room within 48 hours, establishing better communication and a bridge for families moving between care teams.

“It’s hard when your child lands in the NICU. I wanted to be absolutely certain that knowledge about my child’s unique situation was transferred – accurately and completely – from one care team to the other. Hearing about an exchange of information is one thing; actually being involved is another.”

Rick Lundeen, parent

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