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The Best Transplant Care

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Pioneering organ transplant surgeon Dr. Jorge Reyes directs transplant services at Seattle Children's and the University of Washington Medical Center. He is also a professor and chief of the Division of Transplantation at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

A national leader in the field of pediatric organ transplantation, Dr. Reyes has performed more than 1,000 pediatric liver transplants and 90 multi-organ transplants in children, including the first combined heart and liver transplant in a child.

He is one of the few surgeons who perform living-donor liver transplants, and is an innovator in the surgical modification of donor grafts to increase the availability of organs for children.

A World-Class Transplant Program

Dr. Jorge Reyes and patient

Dr. Jorge Reyes and patient

Dr. Reyes is leading Children's transplant team in the development of a state-of-the-art intestine transplant program to further enhance our existing liver and kidney transplant programs.

Pending the award of a certificate of need, he expects to begin performing small bowel transplantation at Children's this year. This life-saving procedure is currently performed at just a handful of hospitals worldwide.

Dr. Reyes was born in Panama. Following his early medical education and residencies in Brazil, he served a clinical fellowship in surgical pathology at Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Learn more about Children's transplant program.

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