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Q-and-A with Marian Sinkey, RN, Clinical Transplant Nurse

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Marian Sinkey, RN

Marian Sinkey, RN

What’s the best thing about working at Seattle Children’s?

I am fortunate to have the chance to develop long-term relationships with my patients as their primary transplant coordinator. This allows me to understand each unique situation and streamline my practice accordingly.

What do you like most about the work you do in the Transplant Center?

My supervisors encourage a strong sense of teamwork and they reward creativity. This has inspired me to help develop a program that has improved patients’ compliance to treatment plans during the post-transplant transition process.

What makes Children’s Transplant Center unique?

I have worked in many different hospitals in my long nursing career and Children’s commitment to providing all children access to medical care is one of the strongest that I’ve seen.

What made you want to come to Children’s?

I started here 16 years ago after a long nursing journey crystallized my love for pediatrics. I knew working here would give me endless opportunities to advance my nursing career.

What do people say when they find out you work here?

I usually get very positive feedback that I am contributing above and beyond the normal expectations of a nurse. Just recently, I was hurried across the Canadian border when I answered the question “where do you work?” I could feel the admiration and credibility they attributed to my employment at Children’s so they asked no more questions and shooed me across into the United States.

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