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Q-and-A with Michelle Moore, Transplant Specialist

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Michelle Moore, Transplant Specialist

Michelle Moore, Transplant Specialist

What’s the best thing about working at Seattle Children’s?

Working with the kids and their families! It is wonderful to see the transformation that our patients and their families go through before and after a transplant.

What do you like most about the work you do in the Transplant Center?

I like meeting and developing a relationship with our transplant patients and their families. It’s also satisfying to work with the transplant team to help our patients through the process of being referred to us for a transplant, the work-up and listing [to receive an organ] and then being able to see the family’s joy when an organ becomes available for them. It is truly a miracle of life and I am blessed to be a part of it.

What makes Children’s Transplant Center unique?

The expertise and knowledge of all the different individuals that comprise the transplant group is phenomenal! The fact that each person on the team has a contribution that is valued by the rest of the team and the knowledge that, as a team, decisions are made that can improve the life of our patients. Our patients benefit from the coordinated specialty care that they receive here — whether in a clinic setting or during a stay in the hospital.

What made you want to come to Children’s?

I had heard such wonderful things about the staff and the environment for the kids when they are patients. I’ve been here for nine years, and I still love it!

What do people say when they find out you work here?

I am almost always told a story about when their child was patient here, or their neighbor’s child, or a co-worker’s child. Children’s has treated and helped so many children over the years. It is a wonderful resource to the community.

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