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Q-and-A with Timothy Cox, PhD

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Timothy Cox, PhD

Timothy Cox, PhD

What's the best thing about working at Seattle Children's?

Everyone has a really positive attitude. Also, there is a strong commitment to promoting and undertaking the best possible research to advance the treatment and care of the young patients. What could be more important?

What do you like most about the work you do in the Craniofacial Center?

People on the Craniofacial team are enthusiastic and the work is done in an environment that appreciates the importance of addressing both the clinical and basic issues.

What makes Children's Craniofacial Center unique?

The interest and commitment in understanding all issues contributing to craniofacial malformations and their treatment. The closeness of and the interactions between the clinical staff and the research staff.

What made you want to come to Children's?

The team, the reputation of the hospital, the clinical strengths and ease of interaction with all staff and the enthusiasm of the leadership to making Craniofacial a real strength.

What do people say when they find out you work here?

All very positive about Children's and the work that gets done there.

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