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Q-and-A with Samuel R. Browd, MD, PhD

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Samuel R. Browd, MD, PhD

Samuel R. Browd, MD, PhD

What’s the best thing about working at Seattle Children’s?

The best thing about working at Children’s? The kids! Going to work every day with the idea that you can hopefully fix a problem that has brought a child into the hospital is exciting and never gets old. You wake to each new day with the hope of returning kids to health and the promise that their future is bright and free of disease.

What do you like most about the work you do in the Neurosurgery Division?

Neurosurgery is inherently complicated, and the diseases are among the most difficult to treat. The challenge of working on the brain and spinal cord and the limitless potential for recovery that kids demonstrate make neurosurgery so exciting and rewarding.

What makes Children’s Neurosurgery Division unique?

Our division is unique in regard to the breadth of experience that is brought to tackle these complicated neurosurgical diseases. Each member of the faculty has specific areas of expertise that makes the group well rounded and able to tackle any neurosurgical disease. Plus, we are a fun group, and our excitement about neurosurgery is evident in our work every day.

What made you want to come to Children’s?

I came to Children’s and the University of Washington Department of Neurosurgery to participate in their world-class program of patient care and research. A hospital works like a team, and you need good coaches and players to make the team successful. Regarding research, Children’s and UW are on the forefront of discovery, and I hope to contribute to these successes.

What do people say when they find out you work here?

I have not met anyone who either hasn’t come to Children’s with their own kids or knows someone who has been treated. The community is very supportive of Children’s, and the reception I have received has been great. I certainly feel part of the Children’s family. I look forward to contributing to the remarkable medical care offered at Children’s and working with the caring and compassionate staff that make such an amazing hospital run day to day.

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