Skip to main content

Search
Stories

Prevention Saves Lives

|

Dr. Linda Quan, teen, pool

The facts are sobering: injuries and trauma are the leading cause of death among children, teens and young adults. What's more, half of all adult illness and death is caused by behaviors and disorders that begin in childhood.

That's why we are committed to stopping preventable injuries and diseases before they begin, and improving the health and well-being of children who have never set foot in our hospital.

Children's – in partnership with Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, county and state health departments and others – has created programs for promoting healthy lifestyles, booster seats and water safety that have become models for reducing obesity and preventable injury.

Much of this work is made possible by the generosity of a caring community.

Healthier kids. Healthier communities. Seattle Children's. What could be more important?

Propelling Change

Families, health care providers and communities look to Children's for advice on keeping children safe and healthy.

And we respond with research, programs and sometimes even advocacy for laws that move people toward healthier behaviors.

Dr. Linda Quan is world renowned for her work to understand the behaviors and risks that lead to unintentional drowning and her groundbreaking work that has lead to safer practices in, on and around the water.

Preventing injuries and illnesses means finding ways to help people modify their behaviors. And that requires understanding who is at risk, what motivates their behavior and how to create programs that address their unique needs.

So, whether it's a life-jacket fashion show for teenagers, a Spanish-language booster seat campaign that addresses Washington state's growing Latino population or programs to combat the growing problem of obesity in youth, Children's finds opportunities to step up where needed.

It's one of the many ways Children's contributes to a healthier community.

Latest News

The Fault in “The Fault in Our Stars”
7.24.14 — On the Pulse Blog

I loved “The Fault in Our Stars.” Both the book and the movie. I read the book a few years ago during a flight. I cried so hard ... cont.

Doctor uses scorpion venom to locate cancer cells
7.23.14 — FOX News

Dr. James Olson is a pediatric oncologist at Seattle Children’s, and the scientist who developed a compound using a protein ... cont.

Boy healing quickly after heart transplant
7.22.14 — The Columbian

In less than two weeks, Jack Conover went from being a 7-year-old in need of a heart transplant to a vibrant boy walking out of ... cont.