Skip to main content

Search
Stories

Electrophysiology Reduces Heart Transplants

|

Just a few years ago, intractable arrhythmias — difficult-to-treat heart rhythms — required a heart transplant. Now, many can be corrected in the electrophysiology laboratory at Children's.

The electrophysiology service diagnoses and treats irregular heart rhythms in Children's state-of-the-art cardiac catheterization laboratory.

"When a child's heart beats too fast," says Dr. Jack Salerno, Children's electrophysiologist, "we can use radiofrequency ablation to cauterize a small area of tissue that prevents the irregular heartbeat from recurring."

Slow heart rhythms can be corrected with an implantable pacemaker. Heart rhythms that can cause sudden death are treated with an implantable defibrillator, which shocks the heart into beating normally.

Children's was the first to establish a pediatric electrophysiology program in the Pacific Northwest.

Learn more:

Latest News

The Fault in “The Fault in Our Stars”
7.24.14 — On the Pulse Blog

I loved “The Fault in Our Stars.” Both the book and the movie. I read the book a few years ago during a flight. I cried so hard ... cont.

Doctor uses scorpion venom to locate cancer cells
7.23.14 — FOX News

Dr. James Olson is a pediatric oncologist at Seattle Children’s, and the scientist who developed a compound using a protein ... cont.

Boy healing quickly after heart transplant
7.22.14 — The Columbian

In less than two weeks, Jack Conover went from being a 7-year-old in need of a heart transplant to a vibrant boy walking out of ... cont.