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2006 Financial Summary

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Children's Health Care System

 

Operating Revenues and Expenses:
Oct. 1, 2005 - Sep. 30, 2006 (Dollars in Thousands)
Sources of revenues$
Patient service revenues426,670
Research and other government grants43,298
Other revenues24,746
Uncompensated care donations13,410
Unrestricted donations and restricted donations used in operations16,017
Investment income25,872
Total sources of revenues$550,013
Uses of revenues$
Uncompensated care41,729
Salaries and benefits 221,456
Supplies and other expenses205,463
Depreciation and interest38,237
Provision for renovation, new equipment and new programs43,128
Total uses of revenues$550,013

Children's Hospital Foundation, Guild Association and Retail

 

Operating Revenues:
Oct. 1, 2005 - Sep. 30, 2006 (Dollars in Thousands)
Sources of revenues$
Fundraising revenues and support38,706
Children's retail (net revenues from gift shops and thrift stores) 340
Subtotal$39,046
Expenses$
Fundraising and administrative expenses(-)7,814
Total net revenue$31,232

Contributions to Children's

Sources of contributions (% of total $ received)

2006 Sources of Contributions: Individuals 60%, Guild Projects 21%, Corporations 10%, Foundations 4%, Orgs and other donors 4%, Childrens thrift stores 1%

* This category includes donations from service groups (such as Elks, Kiwanis, Foresters) as well as workplace campaigns and non-guild special events.

Uses of contributions

2006 Uses of Contributions: Uncompensated Care 33%, Research 19%, Fundraising and Administration 19%, Patient Care and Hospital Programs 15%, Greatest Need or Unrestricted Gifts 13%, Facilities and Equipment 1%

Volunteers

An average of 1,100 people contributed time and services each month for a total of 134,638 work hours in 2006. Here's how they spent their time:

2006 Volunteers Time: Gift Shops and Thrift Stores 38%, Patient Care Inpatient 32%, Support Services 28%, Patient Care Outpatient 2%

2006 Patient Statistics

 

Patient-related Statistics
Category2006200520042003
Total patient visits222,787215,051209,341206,740
Individual patients71,09576,00074,000n/a
Appointments in our outpatient clinics169,968165,192160,752159,769
Visits to the emergency room31,85229,49729,07927,785
Admissions to the hospital12,32511,60811,41511,425
Short-stay visits8,6428,7548,0957,761
Patient beds250250250208
Avg. length of stay (days)5.35.7n/an/a
Inpatient surgical procedures4,6444,351n/an/a
Ambulatory patient surgical procedures5,8495,831n/an/a
Diagnostic imaging tests75,79574,268n/an/a
Lab tests941,735904,198n/an/a

Where our inpatients come from

2006 Inpatient Locations: Other Washington Locations 49%, Other King Cty locations 28%, Seattle 17%, AK MT ID 5%, Outside WA AK MT ID 1%

Where our physicians travel to provide care

Total of 370 clinic days

2006 Physician Travel: Anchorage and other AK Locations 36%, Other WA Locations 22%, Yakima WA 20%, Wenatchee WA 16%, Kennewick WA 5%, Montana 1%

2006 Staff Statistics

As of Sept. 30, 2006

 

Number of Active Staff
Category2006200520042003
Active staff employed at Children's3,6563,4503,1963,006
Hospital-based physicians453460445420
Hospital-based mid-level health professionals*959580n/a
Community members of our medical staff389415420414
Total active medical staff937970945834

* Mid-level professionals include advance registered nurse practitioners and certified physician assistants.

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