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What Happens to Childhood When You Start Counting Steps?(1)

What Happens to Childhood When You Start Counting Steps?

Source: The New York Times

Fitness trackers and wearable devices are big business these days, and parents tend to hover close, fascinated by the details of their children’s lives. So it’s not surprising that there is interest in fitness trackers as potentially useful tools for kids struggling with weight problems, or for families trying to build more physical activity into their screen-filled lives, or as just one more set of cool electronic toys. “There’s the device, but probably more important is what the person wearing the device brings into the equation,” said Dr. Megan Moreno, an associate professor of pediatrics and health services at the University of Washington in Seattle, who studies the ways that children and adolescents use technology.

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