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Treating the Child's Mind

Treating the Child's Mind

Treating the Child's Mind

Source: Seattle's Child Magazine

While most people begin experiencing migraines in their teen years, children as young as two or three can have them too. Often their symptoms are different than adult migraines, making diagnosis tricky for parents and doctors. Kids who get migraines aren’t guaranteed to get them as adults, says Dr. Heidi Blume, a pediatric neurologist at Seattle Children’s. Interestingly, boys are more prone to getting them than girls, until they hit puberty. She says children’s migraines are often shorter in duration and the pain may be across both sides of the forehead. Sometimes vomiting and dizziness are the most prominent signs. Other symptoms can be blurry vision, difficulty reading, stomach pain, flushing, sweating, pallor, and dark circles under the eyes.