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Mom-to-Be's TV Habits Might Affect Her Child's Weight: Study

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Mom-to-Be's TV Habits Might Affect Her Child's Weight: Study

May 06, 2014

http://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/overweight-kids-health-news-517/moms-prenatal-tv-viewing-during-meals-may-set-stage-for-childhood-obesity-687323.html

 

Source - HealthDay


When an expectant mom regularly eats her meals in front of the TV, chances are she'll continue that habit during her baby's feedings, a new study shows. That's a concern because infants who watch mealtime TV likely become young children who watch TV while eating. And previous research suggests that youngsters who spend a lot of time in front of the TV, especially during mealtime, are at risk of becoming overweight or obese, the researchers noted. The study results don't surprise Dr. Dimitri Christakis, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington and director of the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at Seattle Children's Hospital Research Institute. "The more TV you watch, the more likely you are to do it in all circumstances," he said. "To put the findings in perspective, we know that combining eating and TV viewing is bad. It's the primary way TV leads to increased obesity. We know that from other studies."

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