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FDA raises concerns about three-parent embryo procedure

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FDA raises concerns about three-parent embryo procedure

February 27, 2014

http://www.king5.com/health/FDA-raises-concerns-about-three-parent-embryo-procedure-247578201.html

 

Source - KING 5 TV


In two days of hearings ending Wednesday, a federal committee, including Dr. Douglas Diekema, proved quite skeptical about research that might help some patients birth healthy children – but might also open the door to human gene manipulation. The procedure being considered, called mitochondrial transfer, would mix the genes of two women in hopes of creating a healthy baby. Although the panel, which advises the federal Food and Drug Administration, did not take a vote, many members questioned the ethics of the procedure, and whether the research into it is as far advanced as some supporters claim.

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